Comparative Politics

  • Composite image of Donald Trump pointing, surrounded by clippings of newspaper headlines
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    Is Trump using the ‘fake news’ controversy as an opportunity to keep the media in line?

Is Trump using the ‘fake news’ controversy as an opportunity to keep the media in line?

MSc student Jack Graham gives his take on the recent ‘fake news’ controversy surrounding President-elect Donald Trump and the implications for the media.

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    Why there’s more to the US Election than Trump and Clinton

Why there’s more to the US Election than Trump and Clinton

US Capitol Building (credit: Jonathon Colman)

Department of Government MSc Comparative Politics student Jack Graham gives his thoughts on the imminent US election and explains why there is more to it than Trump and Clinton.

The down-ballot races

Thanks to the seemingly endless ugly spectacle of the 2016 election, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the presidency consists of a celebrity sat in […]

  • Detail of 'Property and Political Order in Africa' book cover
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    Catherine Boone wins 2016 Luebbert Book Award for ‘Property and Political Order in Africa’

Catherine Boone wins 2016 Luebbert Book Award for ‘Property and Political Order in Africa’

Professor Catherine Boone’s latest book, ‘Property and Political Order in Africa,’ has won the American Political Science Association’s ‘Gregory Luebbert Book Award’ for the best book in Comparative Politics published in the last two years. She tells us about the book and her ongoing research.

  • Dilma Rousseff
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    Rousseff: A victim of circumstances or responsible for her own demise?

Rousseff: A victim of circumstances or responsible for her own demise?

On 12 May 2016, the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach and suspend Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s first female president, 55 votes to 22. Professor Francisco Panizza discusses the reasons behind her suspension and upcoming trial, and asks whether Rousseff is responsible for her own downfall or is the victim of economic and political circumstances outside of her control.

  • Lanterns in St Annes Square, Manchester, for the Chinese New Year Photocredit:Gidzy
    Permalink Lanterns in St Annes Square, Manchester, for the Chinese New Year Photocredit:GidzyGallery

    Book Launch- Changing Referents: Learning Across Space and Time in China and the West

Book Launch- Changing Referents: Learning Across Space and Time in China and the West

With Dr Leigh Jenco
Associate Professor in Political Theory
Department of Government, LSE
L.K.Jenco@lse.ac.uk

Featuring commentary by:
William Callahan (LSE), Charles Tripp (SOAS) and Robbie Shilliam (QMUL)

Thursday, 28 April 2016, 4-6pm

London School of Economics, Parish Hall
(Light refreshments to be served)

Globalization has brought together otherwise disparate communities with distinctive and often conflicting ways of viewing the world.  Yet even as these phenomena have exposed the culturally specific […]

A Personal Take on Methods

In 2015, Dr Denisa Kostovicova was awarded a Leverhulme Research Fellowship that has allowed her to study the merits and limitations of a regional approach to transitional justice in the Balkans. In this third blog in the series, Dr Kostovicova addresses the issue of how a researcher’s history and persona shapes research, and how research methods can mitigate the […]

LSE MEXICO WEEK 2016: Mexico and its Place in the World

From 15- 17 March, the Department of Government is proud to host Mexico Week 2016, the 16th edition of the Week co-organised by the Department  of Government and the LSE Student Union Mexican Society.

The Question of Ethics

In 2015, Dr Denisa Kostovicova was awarded a Leverhulme Research Fellowship that has allowed her to delve deep into the merits and limitations of a regional approach to transitional justice in the Balkans.  In the second blog in a series exploring research about the politics of confronting mass atrocity, Dr Kostovicova ponders how well our ‘ethics tests’ prepare us to […]

One Homeland, Two States Public Lecture

Date: Monday, 7 March, Time: 18:00 – 19:30 Venue: London School of Economics, Old building, Room 4.10 (4th floor) Chaired and introduced by: Professor Simon Hix (London School of Economics) Professor Adam Fagan (Queen Mary University of London)

  • Two secondary mass graves near Snagovo, Zvornik, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Permalink Two secondary mass graves near Snagovo, Zvornik, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photocredit: MyBukitGallery

    Researching transitional justice in the Balkans: the victims of war crimes and their civic voice

Researching transitional justice in the Balkans: the victims of war crimes and their civic voice

  In 2015, Dr Denisa Kostovicova was awarded a Leverhulme Research Fellowship that has allowed her to delve into the merits and limitations of a regional approach to transitional justice in the Balkans.  In a series of blogs, Dr Kostovicova explores broader issues about the politics of confronting mass atrocity