Social Care

Direct payments in residential care

by Daniel Lombard

Direct payments have been extended to people living in residential care in England for the first time, in a pilot programme initiated by the Department of Health (DH).

The payments are one method of delivering personalisation, an approach towards public services where support is tailored to the needs and preferences of individual people, in order to promote independence […]

February 22nd, 2017|Social Care|0 Comments|
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    What are the likely economic impacts of an ageing population on end of life care?

What are the likely economic impacts of an ageing population on end of life care?

by Matt Townsend

It is commonly understood that population ageing and the growing numbers of older people will place additional strain on all parts of the health and social care system. However, when it comes to health expenditure at the end of life, recent international evidence suggests that not all costs will increase equally, and some may proportionately lessen.

In a […]

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    Double whammy: transitioning from children’s to adult services and transitioning to adulthood

Double whammy: transitioning from children’s to adult services and transitioning to adulthood

by Marija Trachtenberg

Allan Colver recently gave a talk at the LSE Health and Social Care Formal Seminar. His talk is timely and relevant. It coincides and overlaps on the very same issues covered in the recently launched NICE guideline on the challenges young people face when transitioning from children’s to adult health and/or social care services.

The challenges experienced depend […]

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    The impact of postponement of reforms to long-term care financing in England

The impact of postponement of reforms to long-term care financing in England

by the CASPeR Study team

The delay in the introduction of a lifetime cap on spending on long-term care will result in single and widowed homeowners with modest incomes who need care now or in the near future having to use up twice as much of their capital to pay for their care.

With funding from the Nuffield Foundation we have […]

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    Parenting programmes for mothers with learning disabilities: Investing to save

Parenting programmes for mothers with learning disabilities: Investing to save

A new report from PSSRU suggests that adapted parenting programmes for people with learning disabilities might be a cost-effective way of providing support for this group. The authors – Annette Bauer (Research Fellow) and Gemma Williams (Research Officer) – discuss their findings.

People with learning difficulties face a number of challenges when they become parents; it is often difficult […]

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    Positive behavioural support for adults with intellectual disabilities and behaviours that challenge

Positive behavioural support for adults with intellectual disabilities and behaviours that challenge

by Valentina Iemmi and Martin Knapp

Positive behavioural support (PBS) may be a potentially interesting service for adults with intellectual disabilities and behaviours that challenge, improving outcomes and lowering the cost of care in the longer term. This is the main finding of our initial look at the economic case in collaboration with a small local authority in England, with funding from the National […]

December 3rd, 2015|Social Care|2 Comments|

Internet delivers mixed messages for older people

by Geoff Ellis

How will the internet impact on older people’s ability to maintain social networks in coming decades? A new report argues there will always be a generational divide in capabilities and preferences about information and communication technology (ICT), and this could materially and socially disadvantage some older people.

Jacqueline Damant and Martin Knapp of the Personal Social Services Research […]

August 12th, 2015|Social Care|1 Comment|
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    Socioeconomic position and subjective health and well-being among older people in Europe

Socioeconomic position and subjective health and well-being among older people in Europe

by Sanna Read, Emily Grundy and Else Foverskov

Poorer people are more likely to have a poorer health. Socioeconomic inequality in health extends worldwide and remains persistent in Europe despite increases in wealth, educational attainment, proportions of working in non-manual jobs, and expenditure on health services. All age groups are affected. We reviewed the evidence on health inequalities in Europe, […]

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    Policy process for implementing individual budgets highlights some of the tensions in public policy evaluation

Policy process for implementing individual budgets highlights some of the tensions in public policy evaluation

by Gerald Wistow
Over 40 years ago, the eminent social psychologist Donald T Campbell, complained that excessive commitment to policies had prevented proper evaluation of Lyndon Johnson’s ‘Great Society’ reforms. Campbell urged social scientists to engage with policy makers to ensure that they appreciated the value of evaluation and did not allow its political risks to preclude its thorough application. […]

April 30th, 2015|Social Care|1 Comment|
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    Thousands are missing out on palliative care because of unfair provision

Thousands are missing out on palliative care because of unfair provision

By Josie Dixon

A significant minority of people – at least a fifth of everyone who dies – are not receiving the palliative care they need. Our study on equity in palliative care, funded by Marie Curie, also found that some groups are less likely to receive this care than others.

We undertook a wide-ranging literature and evidence review, including looking […]