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Sequeira,L

March 6th, 2020

57 years after the Robbins Report: teaching and research at the LSE

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 18 minutes

Sequeira,L

March 6th, 2020

57 years after the Robbins Report: teaching and research at the LSE

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 18 minutes

Dilly Fung and Simon Hix, the respective Pro-directors for Education and Research, join us in a two-part podcast to discuss the evolving nature of research and education at the LSE

 

Welcome to The Common Room, a series of podcasts by the LSE Higher Education Blog. Today we will be discussing the teaching-research nexus – the relationship and balance between teaching and research in academia. What are the tensions and complementarities and how can academics successfully navigate this connection?

I’m Lee-Ann Sequeira, your host for this podcast. I am an academic developer at the Eden Centre for Education Enhancement and the editor of the LSE HE blog. This is a topic that is particularly relevant as research-rich education is one of the strands of the LSE 2030 strategy and it’s also related to several blog posts on the LSE HE blog around the value of higher education, precarity, the student experience, government regulations etc.

To discuss these issues and share their own personal experiences, we have with us Professors Dilly Fung and Simon Hix. Dilly is the Pro-director for Education at the LSE and Professor in Practice at the LSE School of Public Policy. Simon is the Pro-Director for Research at the LSE and the Harold Laski Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government. They’re both very well known in their fields, having published papers in leading journals, written books, advised cross-sector organisations, and government committees, and can be heard and seen providing expert commentary in multiple fora.

Headshot of Dilly Fung

Don’t let’s talk about research and teaching;
let’s talk about research and education. 

You cannot be a proper consumer of research in the social sciences, unless you’ve personally experienced what it’s like to do some research.

Simon Hix

What was really nice to hear is acknowledgment - senior-level people like you talking about the fact that younger researchers, younger academics; they do have it more difficult. It's not about just putting in the hours and getting on with it. It is a different environment.

Lee-Ann Sequeira

There is a lot of cross-national or international discussion about how we can better characterise the educational input and impact that an individual has.

Dilly Fung

You might look at me and think that the biggest impact I've had on the world is through my research, but actually the older I get, I realise the biggest impact I've had on the world has been through my teaching.

Simon Hix

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________Disclaimer: This post is opinion-based and does not reflect the views of the London School of Economics and Political Science or any of its constituent departments and divisions.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Credits

Host: Lee-Ann Sequeira

Guests: Dilly Fung and Simon Hix

Producer: Chris Doughty

Equipment: Courtesy of the LSE US Centre

Soundtrack: Nap All Day, Sleep All Night, Party Never Courtesy of Fintan Stack

We are grateful to our guests and partners who collaborated with us to make this podcast a reality.

About the author

Sequeira,L

Lee-Ann Sequeira is an academic developer at the Eden Centre for Education Enhancement at the London School of Economics, and the editor of the LSE Higher Education Blog

Posted In: The Common Room

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