Category Archives: Uncategorized

Aug 1 2016

Statelessness: a forgotten dimension of the Syrian refugee emergency

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* By Harriet Massie The Syrian civil war continues to cause asylum seekers to flee in search of safety and security. People hastily leave their homes and begin the treacherous journey across the continent. This has presented a number of … Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Leila Nasr

May 19 2016

Limiting Sovereignty and Legitimising Intervention

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By Nora Jaber* International law’s elevated focus on the protection of human rights has resulted in a shift from a purely state-centered body of law to one that is increasingly focused on individual rights. This has been accompanied by a … Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Leila Nasr

May 9 2016

Constitutional Rights Law and its Limitations: Topical Examples

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By Anthony Kennelly* One consequence of the post-World War II ‘rights revolution’ is the ever growing use of constitutional law to protect fundamental rights. The goal of this is not only to protect such rights by judicial enforcement, at which … Continue reading

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Apr 25 2016

Transborder Abduction of Hong Kong Booksellers: Implications under International Law

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By Sean Yau Shun Ming* In late 2015, five co-owners of a Hong Kong bookstore – specialising in selling Chinese political books mostly banned in China – all disappeared. Among them, the international community has paid considerable attention to Gui … Continue reading

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Apr 18 2016

A Conversation on Race (Part 3): ‘Race, UK Policy and the Chagos Islander’s case post-2000’

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The following article is the third and final post in a three-week series on the LSE Human Rights Blog entitled ‘A Conversation on Race’. This series has been compiled by MSc Human Rights candidate Allie Funk (A.Funk@lse.ac.uk).  By Cat Gough* “The Foreign … Continue reading

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Apr 11 2016

A Conversation on Race (Part 2): ‘Incarceration of Black Lives in America’

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The following article is the second in a three-week series on the LSE Human Rights Blog entitled ‘A Conversation on Race’. By Jacqueline Stein* To a foreigner, American incarceration rates must be haunting. Figures today report American prison rates toping world charts, … Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Leila Nasr

Mar 3 2016

Alone in the Jungle

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By Daniel Sippel* About 30 miles away from Dover, Rambo asks Liz for new shoes. He needs them to jump on a lorry, which is supposed to take him to his paradise. Last week, a friend of Rambo’s died when … Continue reading

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Feb 1 2016

The Case of the Disappearing Activists: The Fight for Freedom of Speech in China

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By Stephanie Tai* Pu Zhiqiang’s recent suspended jail sentence is a reminder of China’s disturbing crackdown on dissidents and activists. The human rights lawyer was detained in 2014 for nineteen months after attending a gathering commemorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of … Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Leila Nasr

Jan 25 2016

Silencing Dissent: Palestine Solidarity under Attack

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By Ben White* Students at Palestine Technical University in the Occupied West Bank face an unusual challenge in pursuit of their studies: the Israeli military has built a training facility on campus. The university may be the only one in … Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Leila Nasr

Jan 15 2016

Dialling democracy: mobile phones and political participation in Ghana

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Following the extraordinary rise of mobile phone use in Ghana over the last decade, LSE alumnus Andrew Small* examines its potential impact on democracy in the West African country.  In November 2012, weeks before their country’s general election, Ghanaians began … Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Leila Nasr