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    Four principles for practising and evaluating co-production – a view from sustainability research.

Four principles for practising and evaluating co-production – a view from sustainability research.

The co-production paradigm has become commonplace across many disciplines as a means of orchestrating the production of useful knowledge aligned to different social needs. Drawing on the expertise of 36 co-production practitioners in the field of sustainability research, Dr Albert Norström, Dr Chris Cvitanovic, Dr Marie F. Löf, Dr Simon West and Dr Carina Wyborn, present a new working definition […]

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    CRediT Check – Should we welcome tools to differentiate the contributions made to academic papers?

CRediT Check – Should we welcome tools to differentiate the contributions made to academic papers?

Elsevier is the latest in a lengthening list of publishers to announce their adoption for 1,200 journals of the CASRAI Contributor Role Taxonomy (CRediT). Authors of papers in these journals will be required to define their contributions in relation to a predefined taxonomy of 14 roles. In this post, Elizabeth Gadd weighs the pros and cons of defining contributorship […]

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    Book Review: Competitive Accountability in Academic Life: The Struggle for Social Impact and Public Legitimacy by Richard Watermeyer

Book Review: Competitive Accountability in Academic Life: The Struggle for Social Impact and Public Legitimacy by Richard Watermeyer

In Competitive Accountability in Academic Life: The Struggle for Social Impact and Public Legitimacy, Richard Watermeyer critically explores the increasing quantification of academic life and the rise of the marketised competitive university. This book particularly succeeds in not only exploring the futility and counterproductiveness of quantified academic performance metrics, but also revealing how complicity among some academics allows these practices to become […]

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    Not yet the default setting – in 2020 open research remains a work in progress.

Not yet the default setting – in 2020 open research remains a work in progress.

Responding to Daniel Hook’s post, The Open Tide – How openness in research and communication is becoming the default setting, Daniel Spichtinger argues that there remains much work to be done in order for open research practices to become the “new normal”. Highlighting unresolved issues around learned societies and the globalisation of open research policies, he suggests that rather […]

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    A degree of studying –  Students who treat education as a commodity perform worse than their intrinsically motivated peers

A degree of studying –  Students who treat education as a commodity perform worse than their intrinsically motivated peers

One of the pivotal transformations in the marketisation of higher education has been the introduction of tuition fees. A degree from a higher education institution can now, to some extent, be purchased like any other commodity.  In this post Louise Bunce presents evidence that students who identify as consumers of their education perform worse academically than students motivated by […]

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    To improve the global evidence ecosystem we need to listen to the Global South.

To improve the global evidence ecosystem we need to listen to the Global South.

Drawing on their recent study of South Africa’s evidence ecosystem, Ruth Stewart, Harsha Dayal, Laurenz Langer and Carina van Rooyen, show how the global north has much to learn from evidence ecosystems in the global south. Outlining five lessons that can be learnt from the South African evidence ecosystem, they argue that if notions of a global evidence ecosystem […]

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    For the humanities to play a stronger role in public policy making, they must move from individual to institutional engagement

For the humanities to play a stronger role in public policy making, they must move from individual to institutional engagement

What should society expect from the humanities? This question has become pressing in the debate around interdisciplinary research in support of public policy that aims to tackle societal issues. To influence that policy effectively, argues Frans Brom, the humanities must transcend individualism. This would mean not only abandoning “outsider” perspectives focusing solely on criticism of power through individual political […]

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    What we talk about when we talk about universities, a review essay

What we talk about when we talk about universities, a review essay

The history of universities, including in the UK, is always also the history of the political community; their future, equally, dependent on the future of the community as a whole. In this review essay, Jana Bacevic examines two recent books that offer a good illustration of this point, Who Are Universities For? by Tom Sperlinger, Josie McLellan and Richard Pettigrew and British Universities in the Brexit Moment by Mike Finn. 
This review […]

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    To address the rise of predatory publishing in the social sciences, journals need to experiment with open peer review.

To address the rise of predatory publishing in the social sciences, journals need to experiment with open peer review.

Predatory journals are here, but our attention to them is unevenly distributed. Most studies on predatory publishing have looked at the phenomenon in the natural and life sciences. In this post, Maximilian Heimstädt and Leonhard Dobusch analyse the harmful potential of predatory journals for social science and specifically management research. Identifying key threats posed by predatory publishing, they argue […]

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2020: The Top Posts of the Decade

How Academia Resembles a Drug Gang
Academic systems rely on the existence of a supply of “outsiders” ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail. Drawing on data from the US, Germany and the UK, Alexandre Afonso looks at how the academic job market is structured in […]

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January 3rd, 2020|Annual review|0 Comments|

2019 In Review: The Top Posts of 2019

2019 has seen the Impact Blog cover a wide range of subjects, from the increasingly urgent issue of the environmental impact of academic travel, to the more prosaic question of how to approach academic writing. This post brings together the ten most popular posts of 2019.

Academic travel culture is not only bad for the planet, it is also bad […]

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December 31st, 2019|Annual review|0 Comments|

2019 In Review: Metrics and research assessment

As governments increasingly look to national research systems as important inputs into the ‘knowledge economy’, developing ways to assess and understand their performance has become focus for policy and critique. This post brings together some of the top posts on research metrics and assessment that appeared on the LSE Impact Blog in 2019.

Working to the rule – How bibliometric […]

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2019 In Review: The culture of academic publishing

2019 has been a pivotal year for academic publishing and has seen many aspects of scholarly communication critically reassessed. This post brings together some of the top posts on the theme of the ‘culture’ of academic publishing that have featured on the LSE Impact Blog in 2019.

Who are you writing for? The role of community membership on authors’ decisions […]

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2019 In Review: Research Tools & Tech

Digital technologies continue to reshape and reimagine core research practices, from transcribing interviews, to creating entire texts autonomously. This list brings together some of the top posts on research technologies that have featured on the LSE Impact Blog in 2019.

Disrupting transcription – How automation is transforming a foundational research method

The transcription of verbal and non-verbal social interactions is a […]

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2019 In Review: Research on Research

2019 has seen an increased focus on the ways in which different national and international research systems function and how they can be improved. This post brings together some of the top posts on the theme of research on research that have featured on the LSE Impact Blog during 2019.

Pushing research to the limit – Who innovates in social […]

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2019 In Review: Practising research impact

The ways in research shapes and influences the wider world are a key focus of the LSE Impact Blog. This post brings together some of the top posts on the subject of research impact that featured on the Impact Blog in 2019.

Invisible impact and insecure academics: structural barriers to engagement and why we should do it anyway

Participatory Action Research […]

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2019 In Review: Communicating your research

From formal academic papers, to the use of emojis in social media, communicating your research can take many forms. This post brings together some of the top posts on research communication featured on the LSE Impact Blog in 2019.

The Art of Connection – To deliver a good research seminar you need to connect with an audience at a pragmatic, […]

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    Legislative science advice is a powerful tool, yet the majority of parliamentarians around the world don’t have access to it

Legislative science advice is a powerful tool, yet the majority of parliamentarians around the world don’t have access to it

The Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST) has played an important role in UK politics, by providing horizon scanning research summaries to parliamentarians on emerging issues. Here, Sarah Foxen and Chris Tyler discuss the challenges and opportunities faced in setting up services that put leading edge research in front of busy politicians and reflect on their work to help set […]

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