Visa applications: emotional tax and privileged passports

Researcher-artist Bathsheba Okwenje contrasts the visa requirements for a Ugandan national visiting the UK with a UK national visiting Uganda. While highlighting how some passports carry certain privileges, more hidden is the emotional tax non-privileged passport-holders pay by wanting to explore the world, by needing to prove they are worthy of travel in a country that is not their […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Do the best academics fly more?

Academic flying is often justified on the basis that international conferences and travel are important to the production of new knowledge. As such, travel brings researchers into contact with new ideas, allows them to share and refine their own ideas and therefore improves the quality of their research. However, in this post Seth Wynes argues that beyond a certain […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Charting the rise and fall of North American leadership in global science: Insights from the population of Nobel Laureates.

Charting the rise and fall of North American leadership in global science: Insights from the population of Nobel Laureates.

For the majority of the last century North America has been at the epicentre of global scientific research. However, through the course of the 21st century other countries have begun to close this gap in a number of ways, notably China is now the global leader in published research and is on course to overtake the US in […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Reimbursement Culture and Widening Participation in Academia

Reimbursement Culture and Widening Participation in Academia

The cost of academic travel is often covered with upfront payments by researchers that are subsequently reimbursed by their institutions. In this post Sarah Thomson argues, that in order to develop a culture of widening participation in higher education, it is time to rethink this practice and the tacit assumption, especially with regard to PhD researchers, that they have access to the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Don’t let your academic career determine your every move – Should early career researchers be expected to relocate regularly in order to land a permanent job?

Don’t let your academic career determine your every move – Should early career researchers be expected to relocate regularly in order to land a permanent job?

To secure a permanent academic position, it has become an increasingly common requirement for early career researchers to work in a number of institutions, often across a number of countries. In this post, Eva Krockow weighs the benefits of an international career against the costs of constant mobility and suggests that fostering more stable working environments will ultimately prove […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    “Greetings from Berlin, Tokyo, Beijing” – Should we call time on international academic travel?

“Greetings from Berlin, Tokyo, Beijing” – Should we call time on international academic travel?

Citing the ecological damage caused by the frequent international flights made by academics, Jürgen Gerhards asks: do academics really need to travel so much? He then presents four simple changes that could be made to reduce the environmental impact of international academic travel.

 Students and lecturers alike are worried about global warming and related climate change. With a clear ecological […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.