• Permalink Gallery

    6 things policymakers need to know about children and the internet

6 things policymakers need to know about children and the internet

The digital environment offers many opportunities, but also opens up certain risks, particularly for children. How can government action look to maximise children’s online opportunities – thereby boosting digital skills and literacies – without substantially adding to their risks? Sonia Livingstone presents six points that policymakers should consider to encourage wider support of children’s digital opportunities.

I’ve been researching children’s internet use […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Spending Review brings good news for science.

The government’s recognition of the value of the UK research budget in the Spending Review is good news for science and good news for the economy. Romesh Vaitilingam argues new knowledge and innovative ideas generated by research – whether done in the public or private sector – are key drivers of productivity growth. But without public investment, society as […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis by Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen

Book Review: Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis by Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen

In Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis, Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen outline the geographic dynamics of contemporary Jerusalem. While the book is occasionally simplistic in some areas of its analysis, Kenny Schmitt praises the authors for navigating complex terrain with skill and clarity to produce an approachable introduction to the spatial politics of the city.

This […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Essential Guide: Nine ways research gets into Parliament

Discussions about research and policy have a tendency to be more reflective about policy-making in general, rather than focusing on the more practical aspects of how research filters through a variety of networks and into policy discussions. Sarah Foxen looks at nine specific ways research currently gets into Parliament and provides some helpful links on where to start to get more involved.

I recently attended […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Peer review of teaching and the TEF – We need more than a tick-box exercise to improve the quality of teaching.

Peer review of teaching and the TEF – We need more than a tick-box exercise to improve the quality of teaching.

Improving teaching in universities is a worthy aim, but how will the Teaching Excellence Framework recognise and reward quality? Marty Chamberlain looks at how teaching is currently assessed. Peer review of teaching tends to operate superficially when it is decoupled from formal staff development and employee feedback processes. Further complicating matters, in professions underpinned by tacit knowledge, experts tend to rely on personal and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Addressing societal challenges: Joined-up research funding could facilitate innovation and engagement.

Addressing societal challenges: Joined-up research funding could facilitate innovation and engagement.

With changes looming for research councils and research funding as a whole, John Goddard looks at what a more joined-up research council driven by societal challenges would mean for the social sciences. Universities are going to have to increase their capacity to support engagement with society. The social science community therefore needs to actively enter into the fray locally and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Getting smarter about engaging with Parliament: Embrace digital, think interdisciplinary and plan for serendipity.

Getting smarter about engaging with Parliament: Embrace digital, think interdisciplinary and plan for serendipity.

Jennifer Jeffes investigates how higher education institutions can support long-term strategies to boost engagement with Parliament. Strong research relationships spring up often organically, sometimes serendipitously, but almost never overnight. This should serve as a caution to the sector not to take too instrumental a view of research impact, instead focusing on the positive benefits that can yield from developing sustainable research […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Anonymising UCAS forms is only a first step towards fair and discrimination-free university admissions

Anonymising UCAS forms is only a first step towards fair and discrimination-free university admissions

The Prime Minister recently pledged to make university admissions ‘name-blind’, responding to statistics which showed a significant racial imbalance in terms of who is admitted to university, with obvious implications for social mobility, fairness, and access to higher education. Steven Jones argues that while this idea is in many ways sensible, it overlooks other more significant barriers when considering widening […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Without a balance between research and teaching, there will be nothing “higher” about UK education.

Without a balance between research and teaching, there will be nothing “higher” about UK education.

There are a surge of rumours circulating over how higher education will be affected by the government’s Comprehensive Spending Review at the end of the November. Responding to the latest suggestions, Martin Eve writes below directly to Jo Johnson, the Minister for Universities and Science. Whilst there are many causes for concern outlined, of particular concern is the emphasis put on teaching at […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink An unusual stand of ancient ponderosa pine forest growing out of the sand is the outstanding feature of the Lost Forest Research Natural Area, which is located in the northeast portion of the Christmas Valley Sand Dunes Area of Critical Environmental Concern. A remnant of a forest that existed in a cooler and wetter age, these pines survive on half the typical annual precipitation for this tree species due to unique soil and hydrologic properties of the area. The nearest forest is 40 miles to the northwest, yet the pines continue to reproduce and thrive in this environment. Old growth juniper groves also exist in the Lost Forest. Motorized vehicles are allowed in the Lost Forest on routes posted “open.” No cross country use is allowed. Camping is permissible in designated sites only.Gallery

    In a changing world, climate adaptation researchers play a key role in addressing risk and ethical responsibilities.

In a changing world, climate adaptation researchers play a key role in addressing risk and ethical responsibilities.

The uncertainties related to climate science present some unique challenges for policymakers and researchers alike. Drawing on lessons from the health care domain, where there are established mechanisms and processes in place for managing risk, Justine Lacey, Mark Howden and Chris Cvitanovic look at ways researchers can proactively support decision-makers. Could a similar ethics system to the one used by frontline medical professionals […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    The impact of academia on Parliament: 45 percent of Parliament-focused impact case studies were from social sciences

The impact of academia on Parliament: 45 percent of Parliament-focused impact case studies were from social sciences

How does academic research feed into the parliamentary process? Analysing the impact case studies of the 2014 REF, Caroline Kenny draws out potential lessons on how Parliament is currently engaging with academics, and how it might in the future. Impact case studies referring to Parliament were found in all four of the main subject panels, but 45 per cent […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Higher university fees reduce applications and attendance

Filipa Sá uses the variation in the level of university fees between England and Scotland over time to measure the effect of fees on university applications, course choice and attendance. She finds that applications decrease by about 1.6% for a £1,000 increase in fees and courses that lead to lower salaries and lower employment rates after graduation are more sensitive to […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Jo Johnson’s rhetoric around the Teaching Excellence Framework reveals looming challenges for Higher Education.

Jo Johnson’s rhetoric around the Teaching Excellence Framework reveals looming challenges for Higher Education.

Steven Jones takes a closer look at the metaphors of the market and the linguistics of blame, searching for clues about whether the government’s long-awaited Green Paper will offer a Teaching Excellence Framework that divides the sector further or begins to build bridges. Keeping the Higher Education sector on side remains the TEF’s biggest challenge.

This piece originally appeared on […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Five reasons the Teaching Excellence Framework is bad news for higher education

Five reasons the Teaching Excellence Framework is bad news for higher education

Jessica Patterson argues the announcement of proposals for a Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) is bad news indeed for those concerned about a more rapid pace to the marketisation of higher education. Here she outlines five key concerns against a teaching assessment framework given the wider context of greater casualisation and stratification in the workforce and a ‘value for money’ approach […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    How should academics in the field of migration studies respond to the crisis in Calais?

How should academics in the field of migration studies respond to the crisis in Calais?

Bridget Anderson writes that viewing the crisis as a ‘migration problem’ misses the full picture: namely that those stuck in Calais are a symptom of a wider problem encompassing wars on the edges of Europe, an unequal economic system and the legacy of Europe’s colonial history. One way researchers can respond is by thinking about migration as a lens as well […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Was the REF a waste of time? Strong relationship between grant income and quality-related funding allocation.

Was the REF a waste of time? Strong relationship between grant income and quality-related funding allocation.

If the funding allocated to universities on the basis of the REF is correlated to the amount of grant income universities already receive, what is the point of the output assessment process? Jon Clayden explores the relationship between grant income generated and REF-related QR funding and finds a strong correlation between the two, suggesting that the double-counting exercise is surely not the best we […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Permalink Gallery

    Amid mounting political and social uncertainty, institutions must evolve to support evidence-based decision-making.

Amid mounting political and social uncertainty, institutions must evolve to support evidence-based decision-making.

Knowledge exchange is a process often discussed in vague detail in relation to research impact. Chris Cvitanovic looks at the available exchange mechanisms for marine scientists and decision-makers. Survey findings suggest that while engaging with decision-makers was important to scientists on a personal level, a range of barriers prevent this from happening. Formal recognition of engagement activities and dedicated funding and resources […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.