Department Alumni

Retributive Justice: How can it harm a peace process?

In this article, recent graduate from Managing Humanitarianism at the LSE, Monica Adami, examines whether retributive justice can harm the peace process. 

This is the third and final in a series of articles by Monica Adami on Retributive and Restorative Justice.

Supporters of peace in the peace v justice dilemma argue that judicial justice should not take place in some contexts. The range of opponents reaches its maximum with […]

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    The broken promise of solar cooking? The case of Goudoubo Refugee Camp

The broken promise of solar cooking? The case of Goudoubo Refugee Camp

Recent Msc in Environmental Policy and Regulation graduate, Isabella Troconis, tells us about her dissertation research on the potential of solar cooking in the Goudoubo Refugee Camp in Burkina Faso. 

(Featured image: Demonstration of blazing tube use in Saag-Nionigo camp (c) UNHCR 2015)

Can you imagine taking an average of five hours to cook just one meal or walking 20 km a day to get […]

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    What can other cities learn from Mexico City’s bike-sharing scheme?

What can other cities learn from Mexico City’s bike-sharing scheme?

Recent graduate in MSc Development Management, Naima von Ritter Figueres, investigates the success of Mexico City’s EcoBici Bike Sharing Scheme, which systematically broke down social barriers to provide opportunities of introducing the new mode of public transport, and questions if a similar approach could be applied in other megacities around the world. 

Most cities over the past few decades have been shaped by the […]

False Choice Between Retributive and Restorative Justice

In this article, Monica Adami, recent graduate from Managing Humanitarianism at the LSE, analyses the effectiveness of retributive approaches to justice used in the International Criminal Court system. 

This is the first in a series of articles by Monica Adami on Retributive and Restorative Justice.

It is widespread the belief that the retributive approach does not restore peace because it tends not to satisfy victim justice. The main […]

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    What can Indonesia learn from Germany’s ability to move on from their murky past?

What can Indonesia learn from Germany’s ability to move on from their murky past?

Josefhine Chitra, Development Management graduate from the LSE, and Andhyta F. Utami, explain how Indonesia could benefit from adopting Germany’s concept of  Vergangenheitsbewältigung to move forward from the 1965-1966 genocide. 
A couple of weeks ago, over a dozen policemen blocked participants from joining a seminar, titled “Disclosure of Truth 1965/1966,” at the Jakarta Legal Aid Institute (LBH Jakarta). The following day, over a hundred civilian […]

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    The LSE takes Attacks on Healthcare to Health Through Peace Conference

The LSE takes Attacks on Healthcare to Health Through Peace Conference

The International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE) consultancy project gives students the opportunity to work with organisations on real-world, contemporary humanitarian issues. MSc students Michelle Mülhausen, Emma Tuck, and Heather Zimmerman on finishing their consultancy project, have continued to engage with stakeholders and disseminate findings to expand the research and further influence policy.

The consultancy project was undertaken for Chatham House, in partnership with Médecins […]

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    From theory to practice: promoting more inclusive benefits from mining through better measurement and transparency of local procurement

From theory to practice: promoting more inclusive benefits from mining through better measurement and transparency of local procurement

On the 3rd of July 2017, Jeff Geipel, Venture Lead for Mining Shared Value (an initiative of Engineers Without Borders Canada), launched the organisation’s Mining Local Procurement Reporting Mechanism (LPRM) to a room full of  industry professional, development professionals, academics and students. Here he tells us about how the LPRM disclosures work and how the seed of the idea was planted whilst […]

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    Humanitarian space and the deaths of U.N. workers in the Congo

Humanitarian space and the deaths of U.N. workers in the Congo

Amanda Schwartz, MSc Development Studies alumni and co-founder of  The Ring Project, considers the recent murders of two UN experts in Congo and the implications on humanitarian space in context of the worsening political situation within the region.

The New York Times ran an article on May 20th, 2017 titled For 2 Experts Killed in Congo, U.N. Provided Little Training […]

Public-Private Partnerships in Emerging Markets

Nathan Hayes, alumni from the department  of International Development, looks at arguments for and against public-private partnerships (PPPs) in emerging markets.

Emerging markets face the challenge of meeting growing demand for new and better infrastructure services. The World Investment Report 2014 from UNCTAD estimates that the infrastructure investment gap faced by developing countries is some US$1.6 trillion over the period 2015 […]

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    Towards a security-driven development cooperation? Views from Brussels by a former student

Towards a security-driven development cooperation? Views from Brussels by a former student

Jon Martín-Cullell, graduate from MSc in Development Studies 2013, gives his insight into recent discussions between EU member states in Brussels and the long-term consequences they could have on humanitarian aid.

My year in the Development Studies programme at LSE met all my expectations. It was an incredible opportunity to meet students from around the world, do research on a variety of […]