Guest blogger

The Future of Development Aid: Lessons from Covid-19

Guest blogger Grace Avila Casanova, Co-Founder of Impacto International, provides her insight into the effects of Covid-19 and climate change on international cooperation dynamics. 

The simplistic notion of “development aid” has been debated extensively, with no shortage of ideas on the ways international cooperation (IC) dynamics should evolve. But the coronavirus pandemic appears to be fast-tracking this evolution. Countries that reached a […]

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    Is the EU’s solution to palm oil a needed environmental intervention or unwanted post-colonial governance?

Is the EU’s solution to palm oil a needed environmental intervention or unwanted post-colonial governance?

Emma Sowden looks at the potential repercussions of the recent EU parliament vote to ban the use of palm oil for the production of biofuels by 2030. 

As the EU embarks on its new Green Deal for carbon neutrality, Southeast Asian government anxiety is growing.  Prior to the deal, last year saw the EU parliament vote overwhelmingly in support of draft measures […]

The Use of Development Indicators: an Indian case study

Guest blogger, Shubhangi Agarwalla, investigates India’s use of the Ease of Doing Business (EDB) Index as a development indicator. 
“The main advantage of showing a single rank: it is easily understood by politicians, journalists, and development experts and therefore created pressure to reform. As in sports, once you start keeping score everyone wants to win.”

-World Bank Staff Report, 2005
That is precisely […]

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    Why SDG 4 Quality Education is important for poverty reduction

Why SDG 4 Quality Education is important for poverty reduction

Guest blogger, Giorgos Koulouris, looks at the importance of education in combating poverty, social exclusion and inequalities. 

Education is the most powerful tool for combating poverty, social exclusion and inequalities. As Nelson Mandela said: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

The right to education must be universal without discrimination, so that everyone can build a […]

November 25th, 2019|Featured, Guest blogger|0 Comments|

Poverty: The most pressing human rights issue

Guest blogger, Giorgos Koulouris, looks at the current state of global poverty and suggests how the Sustainable Development Goals can help in creating a fairer world for all. 

Mahatma Gandhi had stated that “poverty is the worst form of violence,” a phenomenon that mainly plagues the population in the developing countries. Poverty is key issue for human rights, sustainable development, social […]

Is the law enough to end child marriage?

To meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) campaign to end child marriage (target 5.3), the Bangladesh parliament passed the 2017 Child Marriage Restraint Act which requires marriage registrars to verify age by checking identity cards and birth certificates. Guest bloggers, Sajeda Amin, M Niaz Asadullah, Sara Hossain and Zaki Wahhaj analyse how effective the law has been since its implementation two years ago.

An estimated 650 […]

  • Permalink A female doctor with the International Medical Corps examines a young boy at a mobile health clinic in the village of Goza, near Dadu, in Pakistan's Sindh province. Funding from the UK government is enabling the International Medical Corps to operate mobile health clinics in Sindh, as part of the UK's response to the Pakistan floods. These clinics will provide access to basic healthcare services for thousands of people across Sindh as they return home to communities which were devastated by the floods in August 2010. The floods destroyed clinics and hospitals as well as homes and schools, so mobile teams of doctors, nurses and pharmacists are a vital way of reaching people in need of healthcare. The teams also operate as a disease 'early-warning' system; being getting out into the communities, they can spot the early signs of cholera and other water-borne diseases associated with large amounts of standing water and limited sanitation.Gallery

    Understanding Pakistan’s efforts to align quality healthcare with Sustainable Development Goals.

Understanding Pakistan’s efforts to align quality healthcare with Sustainable Development Goals.

Policy columnist for The Diplomat Magazine and guest blogger, Hannan Hussain, explores the potential of Universal Healthcare in Pakistan with a government-run health protection initiative being piloted in the country’s northern most province, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. 

Development of a quality healthcare system has served as a popular reference point in Pakistani politics and activism. Yet, successive leaderships have struggled to achieve […]

  • Permalink U.S. Army Pfc. Cory Acres, a native of Lakenheath, England, gunner assigned to 2nd Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, uses a handheld interagency identity detection equipment system to scan the fingerprints of an Afghan man June 8, 2012. The HIIDE system scans an individual’s biographical information and matches it against an internal database. The system allows soldiers in the field to quickly identify whether a person of interest is on a watch list and creates reports to support further intelligence analysis.Gallery

    Biometric refugee registration: between benefits, risks and ethics

Biometric refugee registration: between benefits, risks and ethics

Guest bloggers, Claire Walkey, Dr. Caitlin Procter and Dr. Nora Bardelli from Oxford University, explore the potential benefits, risks and ethical challenges of biometric refugee registration. 

UNHCR currently uses biometric technology in 52 countries, which means over six million refugees are now biometrically registered. It is also currently expanding its use of biometrics to capture a full set of refugees’ fingerprints and their […]

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    Ecotourism and Neocolonialism: The human cost of wildlife conservation

Ecotourism and Neocolonialism: The human cost of wildlife conservation

Around the world, people, often indigenous, are becoming “conservation refugees” forced to leave their ancestral homelands for the creation of protected areas and wildlife reserves. Through this process of displacement, conservation has created racialised citizens and politicised landscapes. Guest blogger, Arzucan Askin tells us more. 

Indigenous people and conservationists share a vital and mutual goal: to protect and preserve biological […]

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    The Racial Dimensions Of “Nature”: Environmental Justice and CO2lonialism in Brazil

The Racial Dimensions Of “Nature”: Environmental Justice and CO2lonialism in Brazil

Racial thinking shapes the spaces in which we live and the way we perceive the environment. The concept of “race” is inseparable from contemporary environmental issues and linked to colonial legacies. In Brazil, racial discrimination is deeply intertwined with development and the protection of the Amazon. Guest blogger, Arzucan Askin tells us more. 

The linkages between climate change, colonialism, and capitalism […]