Guest blogger

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    Ecotourism and Neocolonialism: The human cost of wildlife conservation

Ecotourism and Neocolonialism: The human cost of wildlife conservation

Around the world, people, often indigenous, are becoming “conservation refugees” forced to leave their ancestral homelands for the creation of protected areas and wildlife reserves. Through this process of displacement, conservation has created racialised citizens and politicised landscapes. Guest blogger, Arzucan Askin tells us more. 

Indigenous people and conservationists share a vital and mutual goal: to protect and preserve biological […]

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    The Racial Dimensions Of “Nature”: Environmental Justice and CO2lonialism in Brazil

The Racial Dimensions Of “Nature”: Environmental Justice and CO2lonialism in Brazil

Racial thinking shapes the spaces in which we live and the way we perceive the environment. The concept of “race” is inseparable from contemporary environmental issues and linked to colonial legacies. In Brazil, racial discrimination is deeply intertwined with development and the protection of the Amazon. Guest blogger, Arzucan Askin tells us more. 

The linkages between climate change, colonialism, and capitalism […]

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    The (not-so) secret winners and losers behind the T-shirt value chain – It is time to change the rules of the game

The (not-so) secret winners and losers behind the T-shirt value chain – It is time to change the rules of the game

Guest blogger and Lecturer in Economics at The Open University, Dr Lorena Lombardozzi, looks at recent charity T-shirt scandals and suggests it’s time value-chains take accountability for societal and workers values.

Some weeks ago the clothing industry faced yet another scandal. Newspapers moralised about the inappropriate pay -35p per hour- that women workers receive in Bangladesh to produce the newly […]

  • Permalink U.S. Soldiers with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 17th Regiment unload Humanitarian aid for distribution to the town of Rajan Kala, Afghanistan Dec. 05, 2009. Charlie Company used their Stryker armored vehicles to move the Humanitarian aid from the Joint District Community Center to the town of Rajan Kala. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II/Released)Gallery

    Do Western donors increasingly use development aid to protect their own security?

Do Western donors increasingly use development aid to protect their own security?

Guest bloggers, Ivica Petrikova and Melita Lazell summarise a paper in which they examine whether and how securitisation has affected the distribution of UK, US, Danish and Swedish development aid by sector through investigating how conflict in aid-recipient states and the extent to which these states are perceived as a security threat, affect aid commitments to priority sectors; democratisation and peace, conflict and security.

There […]

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    Applying the UNHCR Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) to Workers Displaced by AI, Automation

Applying the UNHCR Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) to Workers Displaced by AI, Automation

MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies candidate, Emma Smith, and her father, Ross Smith, a Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts, explore how the UNHCR Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) can be applied to the coming age of AI-based worker displacement. 

Since the dawn of humanity, the nature of our work has been constantly evolving. From the cradle of civilization to the […]

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    Why randomised controlled trials inevitably produce biased results

Why randomised controlled trials inevitably produce biased results

Marie Curie Research Fellow, Alexander Krauss, explains why despite social and medical sciences depending on randomised control trials, they face more biases than thought, impacting the reproducibility crisis. This blog post is based on the author’s article, “Why all randomised controlled trials produce biased results”. 
Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are generally viewed as the foundational experimental method of the social and medical sciences. Economists […]

  • Permalink Flower petal covered footpath in Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh Gallery

    What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

What should be the future of UK-Bangladesh relations after aid? Exit DFID, enter the Universities.

Guest bloggers Saleemul Huq, International Centre for Climate Change and Development, and David Lewis, Department of Social Policy at the LSE, suggest a new future for UK-Bangladesh relations once Bangladesh graduates from a Least Developed Country to a Middle Income Country in 2021. 

Ever since Bangladesh became an independent country in December 1971 the United Kingdom has been a major development partner. For the […]

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    Should we compete or cooperate in international development?

Should we compete or cooperate in international development?

Why are partnerships important for sustainable development? Why can’t development actors simply go it alone? Why not strive to be everything for everyone: the “one stop shop” for development assistance? Guest blogger, Cameron Diver, Deputy Director-General at The Pacific Community (SPC), gives us an insight into the potential of partnerships.

In today’s crowded international development space and with extra pressure on traditional […]

Putting Happiness into Public Policy

Guest blogger, Paul Anand, Professor of Economics at the Open University, tells us about the Global Wellbeing Report which launches today, on the International Day of Happiness.

Sensible people often roll their eyes at the thought of all that fluffy happiness nonsense impacting policy until they recall that its absence is the direct cause of a range or rather unpleasant events […]

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    Development as Happiness: A New Approach to International Development?

Development as Happiness: A New Approach to International Development?

In our first post for 2018, we question whether and how governments should incorporate happiness into their development agenda. 

Development should denote more than just delivering the most basic of public goods. The term embodies a sense of hope and aspiration for a better future that goes beyond meeting the basic survival needs. It would rather be disappointing to narrow […]