Publications

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    In Bolivia’s Footsteps: structural change and political disintegration in the West. Part 3/5: Four lessons for the West

In Bolivia’s Footsteps: structural change and political disintegration in the West. Part 3/5: Four lessons for the West

In the third blog post of this five-part series, Professor Jean-Paul Faguet uses Bolivia’s experience to derive lessons for the West.   

Click here to hear Duncan Green’s interview with Jean Paul Faguet on what Bolivia tells us about rapid collapses of Political Party systems.
PART 3: Four lessons for the West
What lessons does the Bolivian experience hold for Europe, the UK and the US? A […]

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    In Bolivia’s Footsteps: structural change and political disintegration in the West. Part 2/5: Collapse and rebirth

In Bolivia’s Footsteps: structural change and political disintegration in the West. Part 2/5: Collapse and rebirth

In the second blog post of this five-part series, Professor Jean-Paul Faguet  explains Bolivia’s political collapse as a deep tectonic shift in its main axis of politics.   

Click here to hear Duncan Green’s interview with Jean Paul Faguet on what Bolivia tells us about rapid collapses of Political Party systems.
PART 2: Collapse and rebirth
The collapse of Bolivia’s politics was not caused by a president’s […]

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    In Bolivia’s Footsteps: structural change and political disintegration in the West. Part 1/5: Stability and collapse

In Bolivia’s Footsteps: structural change and political disintegration in the West. Part 1/5: Stability and collapse

In the first blog post of this five-part series, Professor Jean-Paul Faguet summarises a recent article he wrote in which he suggests we can open an analytical window into the causes of the rapid collapse of previously stable political party systems by examining the experience of Bolivia.  

Click here to hear Duncan Green’s interview with Jean Paul Faguet on what Bolivia tells us about rapid collapses of Political […]

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    Book Review: Nationalism, Development and Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka by Rajesh Venugopal

Book Review: Nationalism, Development and Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka by Rajesh Venugopal

Dr Rajesh Venugopal’s new book, Nationalism, Development and Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka, offers a fresh look at how colonial legacies, nationalist ideology and discourses of development that have combined to shape the contours of Sri Lanka’s current tumultuous politics. Benjamin Brown, from University of Edinburgh’s Institute of Geography, reviews the book.  
If you are interested in this review, author Dr Rajesh Venugopal will be discussing […]

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    The dark side of a successful developmental state: Singapore’s socioeconomic dilemma

The dark side of a successful developmental state: Singapore’s socioeconomic dilemma

Alumna and 2017 Winner of the Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance in MSc Development Management, Agnes Chew, examines the dark side of a successful development state with Singapore as a case study, investigating the current socioeconomic dilemma faced in terms of growth, inequality, and societal wellbeing.

This article is based on her prizewinning dissertation titled “The Hidden Costs […]

Professor Tim Dyson on a population history of India

Tim Dyson, Professor of Population Studies in the Department of International Development at LSE, tells us about his new book, A Population History of India: From the First Modern People to the Present Day.

Six years ago, I sat at my desk with a period of sabbatical leave stretching before me. There were several topics which I might have researched, but […]

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    Evaluating the Remnants of the Washington Consensus – A Study on Water Privatization

Evaluating the Remnants of the Washington Consensus – A Study on Water Privatization

Sylvia Cesar, MSc Development Management 2017-2018, summarises her recently published article titled ‘Privatization of Water: Evaluating its Performance in the Developing World’. 

The 1990s Washington Consensus and structural adjustment recommendations have been widely criticized in the International Development sphere for several reasons. The literature has indicated that the social and political context in which these neo-liberal economic policies were implemented […]

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    The impact of bank de-risking on the humanitarian response to the Syrian crisis

The impact of bank de-risking on the humanitarian response to the Syrian crisis

A recent publication from Dr Stuart Gordon, Alice Robinson and Harry Goulding from the LSE, reveals the impact of bank de-risking on the humanitarian response to the Syrian crisis. The publication was written in collaboration with Rawaad Mahyub, Executive Director of the Humanitarian Forum, for the Humanitarian Policy Group. 

The Syrian crisis is a complex environment for aid agencies wishing to […]

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    Why randomised controlled trials inevitably produce biased results

Why randomised controlled trials inevitably produce biased results

Marie Curie Research Fellow, Alexander Krauss, explains why despite social and medical sciences depending on randomised control trials, they face more biases than thought, impacting the reproducibility crisis. This blog post is based on the author’s article, “Why all randomised controlled trials produce biased results”. 
Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are generally viewed as the foundational experimental method of the social and medical sciences. Economists […]

The Last Best Aid? Rethinking Paralegal Assistance

International paralegal aid is often cast as uniquely effective and able to work in almost any context. Dr Geoffrey Swenson’s post for Political Violence at a Glance shows that while paralegal assistance is a valuable tool, it’s far more constrained than currently understood. This article draws on research from the following paper: The promise and peril of paralegal aid.

In an era […]