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  • Kuala Lumpur City Centre Malaysia (Photo credit: Hadi Zaher via Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/hazara/11446765955/) Shared via CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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    Malaysia’s leaders no longer serve the people – Danny Quah

Malaysia’s leaders no longer serve the people – Danny Quah

Malaysia has gone rogue – with a corrupt political elite, a compromised judiciary, an electoral process that isn’t working, and a system that punishes whistle-blowers, says LSE’s Danny Quah. (Originally published by The Diplomat.) In 1971, more than forty years before the world would turn its attention to the so-called one percent and the problem of income inequality, Malaysia embarked […]

How can big aid organizations become Fit for the Future?

Duncan Green, Professor in Practice and senior strategic adviser for Oxfam, gets critical of international NGOs, prompting Oxfam’s Deputy CEO Penny Lawrence to issue a response. [Originally posted on ‘From Poverty to Power’] My navel-gazing paper on the future of INGOs and other big aid beasts came out last week. Here’s a summary I wrote for the Guardian. Thanks to […]

An economics fit for the 21st century

Professor Robert Wade letter to Guardian, which published edited version of last paragraph, 7 Apr 2014. You suggest that economists’ propensity to treat the subject as a branch of applied mathematics limits its usefulness (“Economics: A discipline ripe for disruption”, 3 April). But mathematical formalism does not only limit its usefulness; it also smuggles in normative judgements under the guise […]

Can Subnational Autonomy Strengthen Democracy in Bolivia?

Faguet, J.P. 2013. Publius: The Journal of Federalism. doi: 10.1093/publius/pjt020 Bolivia is well known internationally for two things: President Evo Morales, the first indigenous president in its 188 year history, and its place at the base of the cocaine trade.  But in policy circles it is also well known for something less controversial but possibly more important – a radical, […]

February 18th, 2014|Publications|0 Comments|

Land of conflict

Why are land rights a growing source of tension in Africa? Professor Catherine Boone explains the complexities and discusses her latest book, Property and Political Order: land rights and the structure of politics in Africa, with Syerramia Willoughby. Syerramia Willoughby: Why are land rights in Africa so important? Catherine Boone: One reason is that in most African countries, between 50 […]

January 20th, 2014|Publications|0 Comments|

How to end Syria’€™s ‘new war’

Professor Mary Kaldor
Director, Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, LSE

Writing for Al Jazeera America:

The much-delayed Geneva II talks, meant to discuss an end to the war in Syria and scheduled to take place last week, have been postponed once again, with no new date set. Meanwhile, in Syria there will be more deaths, more hardship and disease, more […]