Asia Foundation

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    Cosmological and Communal Wellbeing in the JSRP’s Research on Justice Provision

Cosmological and Communal Wellbeing in the JSRP’s Research on Justice Provision

In this blog, Tom Kirk and Holly Porter explore the JSRP’s work on how local understandings of justice are often embedded in notions of cosmological and communal wellbeing. Furthermore, they argue that practitioners that do not ground their interventions in these understandings risk creating a gap between their own normative assertions about what justice ought to achieve, and how […]

Citizen-Led Accountability and Inclusivity in Pakistan

Read Tom Kirk’s new JSRP Paper, ‘Citizen-Led Accountability and Inclusivity in Pakistan’, here.

Abstract: This ‘theory in practice’ paper examines the experiences of citizens groups seeking to hold Pakistan’s elected representatives and governance institutions accountable. A sustained period of democracy, ongoing devolution plans and increasing space for civil society suggest the beginnings of a favourable context to improve the demand […]

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    Six Key Findings on the Use of Theories of Change in International Development

Six Key Findings on the Use of Theories of Change in International Development

By Craig Valters The Theory of Change approach is becoming a pervasive part of development practice: as an artefact, as a management tool, and increasingly as a common discourse which implementers use to explain and explore their interventions. My new JSRP paper, ‘Theories of Change in international development: communication, learning or accountability?’ seeks to address a critical gap in understanding […]

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    Conference at LSE: Can Politics and Evidence Work Together in International Development?

Conference at LSE: Can Politics and Evidence Work Together in International Development?

Can Politics and Evidence Work Together in International Development? Insights from Security and Justice Programmes in Conflict-Affected Areas
1.30 – 6.30, Tuesday July 1st 2014, Room 4.02, Clement House, LSE
‘Working politically’ and ‘evidence-based policy’ often co-exist as buzzwords within development discourse and policy documents, but can they genuinely complement each other in practice, since the requirements, and timelines, of rigorous evidence production […]

Women’s Experiences of Local Justice: Community Mediation in Sri Lanka

By Ramani Jayasundere and Craig Valters ‘Informal’ justice is increasingly on the international development agenda (for example see here and here), based on the recognition that in many parts of the world, ‘formal’ justice systems are far from the first port of call for citizens with a grievance or dispute. It is estimated that as many as 80-90 per cent of […]

Making the Evidence Agenda in Development More Plausible

By Mareike Schomerus “What is the evidence?” This must be the most common question in development programming and policy these days. Donors are pressing practitioners to present evidence that their programming approaches are working – themselves under pressure to show measurable results and the evidence for those. At the same time, while the question about evidence is commonplace, there is no […]

Research Effectiveness: The Case of the Mindanao Conflict

By Steven Rood Research is most useful for development practitioners when it is embedded in the entire endeavor, directing and directed by actions and reflections throughout implementation, rather than being something done initially to design a project and at the end to evaluate it. The root of The Asia Foundation’s conflict management initiatives in the Philippines was a decision in […]

The Boundaries of Evidence in Conflict Management and Peacebuilding

By Jeroen Adam In The Asia Foundation’s recent report, “Subnational Conflict and International Development Assistance,” the authors argue that a sustainable solution to the many subnational conflicts plaguing different countries in Asia will ultimately depend on a true political transformation. As explained by the authors, subnational conflicts are rooted in entrenched horizontal inequalities as minority ethnic populations are systematically excluded from access to […]

Getting Academics and Aid Workers to Work Together

By Matthew B. Arnold Aid workers and academics would seem natural collaborators. Development studies courses are common and it is routine to find academics who oscillate between the academy and the field as aid workers. In turn, the aid world often calls upon academics to provide expert advice and looks to their literature for guidance. Overall, though, the relationship is […]

Can Theories of Change Reflect the Realities of International Development?

By Craig Valters Can a ‘Theory of Change’ really be an honest, accurate and transparent reflection of how a development intervention may lead to change? Theories of Change are often required by donors in international development. They commonly take the form of a document describing how and why an organisation’s programme will make a difference on the ground. Yet the […]