Conflict

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    Elections in Uganda 2016: Rumours and the Terror of the Unknown

Elections in Uganda 2016: Rumours and the Terror of the Unknown

Henni Alava and Cecilie Lanken Verma explore what is needed to secure a relatively peaceful election in Uganda, and what this may mean in the long-run. Two parallel realities appear to exist in pre-election Uganda, especially when seen from the northern region of Acholiland ten years after it was declared ‘post-conflict’. In one, everything is ‘fine’: the elections will be […]

Book: Making Sense of the Central African Republic

The JSRP is proud to introduce a new volume on the Central African Republic edited by our Research Director, Tatiana Carayannis, and Yale University Associate Professor, Louisa Lombard.

Lying at the center of a tumultuous region, the Central African Republic and its turbulent history have often been overlooked. Democracy, in any kind of a meaningful sense, has eluded the country. […]

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    Dorothea Hilhorst Provides Expert Briefing to the UN on Sexual Violence Response in the DRC

Dorothea Hilhorst Provides Expert Briefing to the UN on Sexual Violence Response in the DRC

On Wednesday 27th January, Professor Dorothea Hilhorst will give an expert briefing in New York at the UN on a major forthcoming report co-funded by the Justice and Security Research Programme (JSRP), the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC). The briefing will take the form of a brownbag lunch, and will cover the […]

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    From ‘Autochthony’ to Violence? ‘Sons of the Soil’ Discourses and Practices of Violence

From ‘Autochthony’ to Violence? ‘Sons of the Soil’ Discourses and Practices of Violence

Claims of being ‘sons of the soil’ or ‘indigenous’ inhabitants as opposed to ‘foreigners’ play a prominent role in violent conflict around the world. Yet, as this blog argues, the violence occurring in these settings is not always directly related to these claims. The recent upsurge of global attention to intensifying refugee and migrant streams has revealed once again the […]

Mary Kaldor Reacts to the Paris Attacks

Writing for The Nation today on “Why Another ‘War on Terror’ Won’t Work”, Mary Kaldor, JSRP CEO and Professor of Global Governance at LSE, bemoans what she describes as an “anachronistic and short-termist” response to the attacks, drawing lessons from the post-9/11 response to Al Qaeda and locating ISIS as “a symptom of the absence of legitimate government in Iraq and Syria”.

Read the […]

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    Myths Set in Motion: The Moral Economy of Mai-Mai Governance

Myths Set in Motion: The Moral Economy of Mai-Mai Governance

In the newly published edited volume Rebel Governance in Civil Wars (Cambridge University Press, 2015), JSRP researcher Kasper Hoffmann contributes a chapter about Mai Mai rebels’ governance of civilians in eastern Congo. In the chapter, ‘Myths Set in Motion: The Moral Economy of Mai-Mai Governance’, he argues that neither greed nor ideology alone can explain why some rebel groups choose to govern civilians […]

Corruption, Protest and Militancy

Corruption is not a victimless crime. With the effects of corruption and money laundering very much on the agenda of recent speeches by UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, and with growing public and political interest in a better understanding of the  drivers of corruption, the JSRP recently held a two-day retreat at St. George’s House, Windsor, to debate the issues.

Although […]

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    Preventing Land Dispossession in Africa: Do we need Stronger Justice Mechanisms?

Preventing Land Dispossession in Africa: Do we need Stronger Justice Mechanisms?

By Moses Adonga, Rachel Ibreck and Godfrey Victor Bulla There has been a global awakening to the opportunities and costs of land grabs in Africa. Academics and activists are duly investigating the scope and impacts of large-scale land seizures; the plight of victims has gained recognition; and there are moves to promote ‘responsible’ corporate investments. In contribution to the ongoing […]

Mobutu’s Lingering Legacy in Gbadolite

By Aaron Pangburn As we approach the 50th anniversary of President Mobutu Sese Seko’s rise to power, and the debates over the “next Congolese President” in 2016 intensify, it is a unique moment to reflect on his legacy and his lingering impact on the locality he once called home. The story of Gbadolite (in the territory of Nord-Ubangi and the […]

South Sudan: A Slow Liberation

By Edward Thomas Twentieth-century Sudan was Africa’s conflicted behemoth: a landmass of one million square miles; societies rich with interconnections and contradictions; and a highly unequal economic and political system that set those societies against each other. The 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, signed ten years ago, was supposed to end the armed conflicts born of this economic and political system. […]