Evidence

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    Cosmological and Communal Wellbeing in the JSRP’s Research on Justice Provision

Cosmological and Communal Wellbeing in the JSRP’s Research on Justice Provision

In this blog, Tom Kirk and Holly Porter explore the JSRP’s work on how local understandings of justice are often embedded in notions of cosmological and communal wellbeing. Furthermore, they argue that practitioners that do not ground their interventions in these understandings risk creating a gap between their own normative assertions about what justice ought to achieve, and how […]

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    The Challenge of Theorising Security and Justice Provision in Conflict-Affected Places

The Challenge of Theorising Security and Justice Provision in Conflict-Affected Places

Tom Kirk draws on the JSRP’s research to argue that calls to tackle the root causes of conflict and insecurity in many ‘fragile’ and ‘failing’ states require exploring new frameworks and acquiring historical understandings that can reveal how everyday security and justice is provided.

The JSRP has focused on places – including parts of the DRC, South Sudan, CAR and […]

  • Photo credit: Abizern via Foter.com / CC BY-NC
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    Probing for Proof, Plausibility, Principle and Possibility: A New Approach to Assessing Evidence in a Systematic Evidence Review

Probing for Proof, Plausibility, Principle and Possibility: A New Approach to Assessing Evidence in a Systematic Evidence Review

Anouk Rigterink and Mareike Schomerus’ latest journal paper proposes a new approach to assessing evidence during a systematic evidence review aiming to inform international development policy. Drawing lessons from a number of social science systematic evidence reviews, the article identifies how the method’s limiting perspective on evidence (including the exclusive focus on ‘gold standard’ empirical information) has serious disadvantages for […]

Policy to Research to Policy in Difficult Places

This post by Alex de Waal is a contribution to Humanity’s online symposium on the changing nature of knowledge production in fragile states. There’s a commendable search for rigor in social science. But there’s also an illusion that numbers ipso facto represent rigor, and that sophisticated mathematical analysis of the social scientific datasets can expand the realm of explanatory possibilities. […]

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    Evidence Based Policy or Policy Based Evidence? Supply and Demand for Data in a Donor Dominant World

Evidence Based Policy or Policy Based Evidence? Supply and Demand for Data in a Donor Dominant World

This post by Morten Jerven is a contribution to Humanity’s online symposium on the changing nature of knowledge production in fragile states. In 2010 I was doing research for Poor Numbers: How we are misled by African development statistics and what to do about it. I was In Lusaka, Zambia on a Wednesday afternoon, and was having a free and […]

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    Beyond the Quest for “Policy Implications”: Alternative Options for Applied Development Researchers

Beyond the Quest for “Policy Implications”: Alternative Options for Applied Development Researchers

This post by Michael Woolcock is a contribution to Humanity’s online symposium on the changing nature of knowledge production in fragile states. My nomination for development’s ‘Most Insightful, Least Cited’ paper is Ariel Heryanto’s “The development of ‘development.’”[1] Originally written in Indonesian in the mid-1980s, Heryanto’s gem been cited a mere 79 times (according to Google Scholar), even in its […]

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    Turning the Gaze on Ourselves: Acknowledging the Political Economy of Development Research

Turning the Gaze on Ourselves: Acknowledging the Political Economy of Development Research

This post by Lisa Denney and Pilar Domingo is a contribution to an online symposium on the changing nature of knowledge production in fragile states. Be sure to read other entries, beginning with Deval Desai and Rebecca Tapscott‘s piece. While researchers (ourselves included) now consistently underline the importance of understanding the political economy of developing countries and donors that support them in […]

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    Tomayto Tomahto: The Research Supply Chain and the Ethics of Knowledge Production

Tomayto Tomahto: The Research Supply Chain and the Ethics of Knowledge Production

Humanity recently hosted an online symposium on the changing nature of knowledge production in fragile states. In light of the intensification of evidence-based policymaking and the “data revolution” in development, the symposium asked what the ethical and political implications are for qualitative research as a tool of governance. Featuring many of the JSRP’s team, the symposium began with the below […]

  • Permalink Rwandan military personnel with the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) perform a short-range patrol in Northern Darfur while a child plays with a soccer ball. UNAMID began operations in the region in December 2007.
12/Oct/2009. , Sudan. UN Photo/Olivier Chassot. www.unmultimedia.org/photo/Gallery

    The UN’s Darfur “Cover-up” and the Need for Reliable Conflict Data

The UN’s Darfur “Cover-up” and the Need for Reliable Conflict Data

By Alex de Waal International peacekeeping operations are deployed to complicated and troubled places. Often, reliable information is scarce, rumors and poorly-founded allegations are common, and interpretation of events is highly politicized. Recent controversies around what is going on in Darfur illuminate the need for much better data. A former UN official, Aicha Elbasri, has made much-publicized allegations that the […]

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    Six Key Findings on the Use of Theories of Change in International Development

Six Key Findings on the Use of Theories of Change in International Development

By Craig Valters The Theory of Change approach is becoming a pervasive part of development practice: as an artefact, as a management tool, and increasingly as a common discourse which implementers use to explain and explore their interventions. My new JSRP paper, ‘Theories of Change in international development: communication, learning or accountability?’ seeks to address a critical gap in understanding […]