Uganda

Life after the LRA

The JSRP reached the end of its grant in spring 2017 but several outputs from the programme are scheduled for publication in the coming months. The most recent of these is a new journal article from Holly Porter and Letha Victor drawing on their extensive research with JSRP in the Acholi region of northern Uganda.  The research examined the concept […]

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    The Trial of Thomas Kwoyelo: Opportunity or Spectre – A New Paper by Anna Macdonald and Holly Porter

The Trial of Thomas Kwoyelo: Opportunity or Spectre – A New Paper by Anna Macdonald and Holly Porter

In this blog post, Anna Macdonald and Holly Porter examine the political and social dynamics that shape local perspectives on the first war crimes prosecution of a former Lord’s Resistance Army fighter, Thomas Kwoyelo. This week they published an open-access article in Africa, exploring these issues in depth, based on long-term research on the case since it began in […]

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    Cosmological and Communal Wellbeing in the JSRP’s Research on Justice Provision

Cosmological and Communal Wellbeing in the JSRP’s Research on Justice Provision

In this blog, Tom Kirk and Holly Porter explore the JSRP’s work on how local understandings of justice are often embedded in notions of cosmological and communal wellbeing. Furthermore, they argue that practitioners that do not ground their interventions in these understandings risk creating a gap between their own normative assertions about what justice ought to achieve, and how […]

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    The Unmaking of Public Authority: A New Article by Rebecca Tapscott

The Unmaking of Public Authority: A New Article by Rebecca Tapscott

Theory on state formation and subnational governance generally focuses on ordering—how rulers organize people and space to maximize control and extraction. Indeed, a new literature on “public authority” has recently contributed to the ways in which such order is produced. These theories rest on the assumption that the world is divided into “public” spaces, where the state directly extracts […]

  • Photo credit: O.Taillon via Foter.com / CC BY-ND
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    ‘For God and my country’ – Fighting the (spirits of) Violence and Chaos in Uganda’s Elections

‘For God and my country’ – Fighting the (spirits of) Violence and Chaos in Uganda’s Elections

Through prayer, civic education, summons, pastoral letters and the public blessing of politicians, religious leaders have been doing their best over the past few months to influence the Ugandan elections held February 18th this year. In the limelight, many of the nation’s most prominent religious leaders have campaigned for peaceful, free and fair elections, while others use their pulpits and […]

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    Elections in Uganda 2016: Rumours and the Terror of the Unknown

Elections in Uganda 2016: Rumours and the Terror of the Unknown

Henni Alava and Cecilie Lanken Verma explore what is needed to secure a relatively peaceful election in Uganda, and what this may mean in the long-run. Two parallel realities appear to exist in pre-election Uganda, especially when seen from the northern region of Acholiland ten years after it was declared ‘post-conflict’. In one, everything is ‘fine’: the elections will be […]

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    Fighting to Work: Employment, Not Militias, will Determine Uganda’s Future Stability

Fighting to Work: Employment, Not Militias, will Determine Uganda’s Future Stability

Rebecca Tapscott argues that Uganda’s Crime Preventer program is not just another manifestation of African electoral violence. It is a day-to-day strategy of governing and controlling one of the most threatening segments of the population—young, unemployed and disenchanted youth. It is important not to demonize Crime Preventers as militias in thrall to the President. Rather, the majority of many […]

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    Customary Land, Public Authorities and the Reform Agenda: The Background to Three Reports from northern Uganda

Customary Land, Public Authorities and the Reform Agenda: The Background to Three Reports from northern Uganda

Julian Hopwood overviews three JSRP publications on land in northern Uganda, and suggests that useful policy interventions should acknowledge the expertise of customary actors at the local level. Ambrena Manji has argued that the progressive land reform of post-independence Africa, often involving redistribution, is now rare. In its place we find land law reform, perceived by its promoters as a […]

Karamojong Women and the Extremes of Insecurity

Julian Hopwood, Holly Porter and Nangiro Saum introduce their recent paper examining the security and justice available to Karamojong women following the Ugandan government’s latest disarmament campaign. 

Uganda’s neglected Karamoja region is home to around one million of the country’s poorest people. Traditionally they have been pastoralists but now many say that their cows have gone, and with them […]

The Government Has Long Hands

Rebecca Tapscott highlights some of the findings from her recently published paper ‘The Government Has Long Hands: Community Security Groups and Arbitrary Governance in Uganda’s Acholiland‘ (JSRP Paper 24) In Acholiland, northern Uganda, many villages have local security arrangements, usually comprised of a handful of young men responsible for enforcing local by-laws, arresting suspects who do not comply voluntarily, and patrolling […]