Search results for: Rodrigo Aguilera

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    Can AMLO rescue Mexico’s poorest southern states, like Oaxaca, Chiapas, and Guerrero?

Can AMLO rescue Mexico’s poorest southern states, like Oaxaca, Chiapas, and Guerrero?

Having a southern president for the first time since 1911 could see states like Oaxaca, Chiapas, and Guerrero receive the attention they need instead of being dismissed as a burden on national development. But without the right policies to generate the right outcomes, Mexico’s poor and deprived south could be left waiting once more for a positive change in its fortunes, writes Rodrigo […]

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    Big in 2018: our most popular articles in a turbulent year for Latin America and the Caribbean

Big in 2018: our most popular articles in a turbulent year for Latin America and the Caribbean

Taking a look at ten of our of most popular blogs from 2018, it’s clear that it has been a year of major upheaval in the region. Key issues have been the diverging populisms of AMLO’s Mexico and Bolsonaro’s Brazil, the crumbling of two-party politics in El Salvador, and the ongoing crisis in Venezuela.

But wider trends have also persisted, as reflected in China’s growing […]

By |January 2nd, 2019|Featured|0 Comments
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    Between ghost unions and automation, reforming Mexico’s labour market will be a major challenge

Between ghost unions and automation, reforming Mexico’s labour market will be a major challenge

Mexican workers are paid less and work more than their counterparts in the rest of the OECD, and the situation has only been getting worse. By broaching reform Mexico’s new president Andrés Manuel López Obrador has taken a step in the right direction, but he inherits a labour market plagued by informality, precarity, and lack of union representation, whereas automation poses a serious threat in the longer […]

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    Populism in Mexico and Brazil: why are voters moving in opposite directions?

Populism in Mexico and Brazil: why are voters moving in opposite directions?

Differences in ethnic makeup, religious affiliation, institutional openness to outsiders, experiences of crime, and economic performance have driven Mexican and Brazilian voters in opposite ideological directions: left towards AMLO in Mexico and right towards Bolsonaro in Brazil. But this doesn’t mean Mexico will remain immune to right populism in future, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.

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    Discretionary rule of law in Mexico could undermine AMLO’s anti-corruption drive

Discretionary rule of law in Mexico could undermine AMLO’s anti-corruption drive

Mexico has a long history of discretionary application of the law, as demonstrated recently by the government’s failure to prosecute corrupt state governors while they remained in office. Even from their position of political strength, Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his Morena party may find it hard to revert this trend and make good on their promise to root out corruption, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.

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    Despite reform, Mexico’s 2018 election is business as usual

Despite reform, Mexico’s 2018 election is business as usual

On paper the 2018 Mexican presidential election should benefit from recent reforms that sought to improve electoral conditions. But the reality of campaigns awash with dark money, widespread vote buying, toothless electoral institutions, weak democratic processes within parties, and independents that aren’t very independent suggests that little has really changed, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.