Mexico & Central America

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    AMLO’s balancing act: the democratic and economic challenges facing Mexico’s new president

AMLO’s balancing act: the democratic and economic challenges facing Mexico’s new president

The inauguration of Mexico’s new president Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) will take place on 1 December after his landslide win in recent elections. Common expectations about democratic decline and economic continuity appear wide of the mark, but popular consultations on Texcoco airport and ten major development projects do create new economic uncertainties, writes Graciana del Castillo (City University of New York).

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    The migrant caravan is a practical and political reaction to Mexico’s futile attempts at dissuasion

The migrant caravan is a practical and political reaction to Mexico’s futile attempts at dissuasion

Mexico’s resort to riot police and tear gas is part of a wider effort to scare migrants into returning to Central America. But push factors like extreme violence and grinding poverty weigh far more in the balance than shows of dissuasive violence, writes Alejandra Díaz de Leon (LSE Department of Sociology).

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    Populism in Mexico and Brazil: why are voters moving in opposite directions?

Populism in Mexico and Brazil: why are voters moving in opposite directions?

Differences in ethnic makeup, religious affiliation, institutional openness to outsiders, experiences of crime, and economic performance have driven Mexican and Brazilian voters in opposite ideological directions: left towards AMLO in Mexico and right towards Bolsonaro in Brazil. But this doesn’t mean Mexico will remain immune to right populism in future, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.

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    Elites, violence, and the crisis of governance in Latin America

Elites, violence, and the crisis of governance in Latin America

Relations between the state and oligarchic elites underpin the extreme rise of violence in Latin America, despite the fact that most of its victims and perpetrators are poor: violence is as much a problem of wealth as of poverty. Jenny Pearce (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre) discusses her working paper for our new Violence, Security, and Peace series, Elites and Violence in Latin America: […]

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    Sex trafficking and sexual exploitation are collateral damage of Mexico’s neoliberal fantasy

Sex trafficking and sexual exploitation are collateral damage of Mexico’s neoliberal fantasy

An epidemic of sexual trafficking and exploitation of women and children has turned Mexico into the “Latin American Thailand”. Incoming president Andrés Manuel López Obrador promises to tackle the corruption and impunity enabling these practices, but there is less recognition of their links to a neoliberal fantasy that was once presented as lifeline for poor communities, writes María Encarnación López (London Metropolitan University).

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    The best bookshops in Latin America and the Caribbean: Mexico City

The best bookshops in Latin America and the Caribbean: Mexico City

Which are the best bookshops for academics to visit in Latin America and the Caribbean? As part of their series of Bookshop Guides, our colleagues at LSE Review of Books have been finding out. Here Hung-Ya Lien takes us on a tour of the best bookshops in Mexico City.

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    Discretionary rule of law in Mexico could undermine AMLO’s anti-corruption drive

Discretionary rule of law in Mexico could undermine AMLO’s anti-corruption drive

Mexico has a long history of discretionary application of the law, as demonstrated recently by the government’s failure to prosecute corrupt state governors while they remained in office. Even from their position of political strength, Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his Morena party may find it hard to revert this trend and make good on their promise to root out corruption, writes Rodrigo Aguilera.

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    Shadow carbon pricing can help development banks reduce emissions in Mexico and beyond

Shadow carbon pricing can help development banks reduce emissions in Mexico and beyond

Carbon pricing offers development banks like Mexico’s NAFIN a way to encourage organisations to reduce emissions through adoption of improved technologies and practices. But these positive effects could be further reinforced by encouraging companies to adopt shadow prices, writes Cesar Espinosa García (Nacional Financiera).

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    Big promises, few details: the uncertain future of Mexican healthcare under AMLO

Big promises, few details: the uncertain future of Mexican healthcare under AMLO

Though Mexico’s Seguro Popular public health-insurance scheme has been a great success, system fragmentation, underfunding, coverage limitations, and corruption remain serious challenges. AMLO appears to have the will to reform both the scheme and wider Mexican healthcare, but the way is far less obvious, write Rocio Nava and Emily Adrion (University of Edinburgh).

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    Llamando la muerte por su nombre: rompiendo el silencio del Archivo de la Policía Nacional de Guatemala

Llamando la muerte por su nombre: rompiendo el silencio del Archivo de la Policía Nacional de Guatemala

El análisis cuantitativo del “big data” histórico puede contribuir a explicar cómo las prácticas de generación de registros en torno a la muerte facilitaron las políticas de represión y control, escribe Tamy Guberek (University of Michigan).