Mexico & Central America

  • Permalink Gallery

    Recent innovations in Costa Rican development show the value of Global Value Chain analysis

Recent innovations in Costa Rican development show the value of Global Value Chain analysis

By allowing an understanding of where, how, and by whom economic, social, and environmental value is created and distributed, Global Value Chain research can help to address key development and competitiveness issues, write Gary Gereffi and Karina Fernández-Stark (Duke University Global Value Chain Centre).

  • Permalink Gallery

    El Salvador’s experience of UN peacebuilding reveals the ineffectiveness of ‘development as usual’ approaches

El Salvador’s experience of UN peacebuilding reveals the ineffectiveness of ‘development as usual’ approaches

To provide the vital “peace dividend” of better lives and livelihoods, peacebuilding must promote conflict-sensitive policies even where they are economically second-best. The UN can support this process by helping states in transition to reactivate their economies in an inclusive and sustainable manner, writes Graciana del Castillo (City University of New York).

  • Permalink Shot of a public bicycle station in Mexico CityGallery

    What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

What can the rest of the world learn from Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme?

Mexico City’s EcoBici bike-sharing scheme systematically broke down social barriers to enable the introduction of a new mode of public transport. Naima von Ritter Figueres (LSE International Development) analyses its success and considers whether this approach could work in other megacities around the world.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Calling death by its name: breaking the silence of Guatemala’s National Police Archive

Calling death by its name: breaking the silence of Guatemala’s National Police Archive

Quantitative analysis of historical ‘big data’ can help to explain how record-making practices around death facilitated policies of repression and control, writes Tamy Guberek (University of Michigan).

  • Permalink Controversial events such as the Tlatelolco protests and subsequent massacre in 1968 Marcellí Perelló, public domainGallery

    Mexico’s new General Law on Archives could jeopardise research, journalism, and transparency

Mexico’s new General Law on Archives could jeopardise research, journalism, and transparency

By placing archives under direct control of the executive and creating retroactive rules to define the historical, Mexico’s proposed General Law on Archives could damage academic, journalistic, and popular access to collective memory, writes Alejandro de Coss Corzo.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

Crime costs some Latin American countries more than 6 per cent of their GDP

The cost to Latin America of being the world’s most violent region is not only a human one. New research by Laura Jaitman reveals that its enormous economic costs are equal to annual spending on infrastructure, or enough to halve the region’s housing deficit.

  • Permalink Gallery

    US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

US pressure on Nicaragua will only stall diplomatic engagement and harm its most vulnerable groups

Even with Venezuela’s substantial support in doubt, the nature of Nicaraguan trade, migration, and aid links with the US makes the country less vulnerable to pressure than many expect. Instead, diplomacy and civil society will bear the brunt of unintended consequences, writes Pamela Neumann.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Mexico’s experience shows that development banks can play a key role in financing transitions to low-carbon economies

Mexico’s experience shows that development banks can play a key role in financing transitions to low-carbon economies

Transitioning to low-carbon economies is a vital goal for developing countries, yet significant teething problems remain in the field of climate finance. The case of NAFIN and Mexican wind energy reveals how national development banks are ideally placed to help stimulate this crucial investment, writes Emilio Garmendia Pérez Montero.

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Mexican left should beware nationalism’s crushing embrace

The Mexican left should beware nationalism’s crushing embrace

The history of the left in Mexico shows that embracing nationalism can lead to the lack of a distinct programme and the misreading of opponents as potential allies, writes William A. Booth.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Poetic notions of death in Mexico no longer fit the grim reality of everyday drug violence

Poetic notions of death in Mexico no longer fit the grim reality of everyday drug violence

The romantic idea of death as the quintessence of Mexicanness masks real suffering in a country where senseless death has become commonplace, writes Myriam Lamrani.