Venezuela

  • Permalink Gallery

    Venezuela elections 2018: military and institutional backing could keep Maduro in power despite sanctions

Venezuela elections 2018: military and institutional backing could keep Maduro in power despite sanctions

Further economic deterioration and more drastic international sanctions resulting from a Maduro ‘win’ will only reinforce his linchpin of high-level military support, writes Diego Moya Ocampos (IHS Markit).

  • Permalink Gallery

    US trade sanctions are also hurting Jamaica, Guyana, and the wider Caribbean

US trade sanctions are also hurting Jamaica, Guyana, and the wider Caribbean

The Trump administration’s “America First” policy and sanctions on Russia and Venezuela have significant unintended consequences in the Caribbean, especially for the bauxite industries of Jamaica and Guyana, writes David Jessop (Caribbean Council).

  • Permalink Gallery

    The implications of a divisive Summit of the Americas in Lima

The implications of a divisive Summit of the Americas in Lima

The 8th Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru, will be divisive, potentially leaving Latin America and the Caribbean in leaderless disarray just when changing international relationships require unity and a common identity, writes David Jessop (Caribbean Council).

  • Permalink Gallery

    The only thing keeping Venezuela’s Maduro in power is the opposition

The only thing keeping Venezuela’s Maduro in power is the opposition

If Venezuela’s opposition really wants to remove Nicolas Maduro, it must unite behind renegade candidate Henri Falcon, writes Asa Cusack (LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre). • n.b. republished courtesy of Al Jazeera; Creative Commons licence does not apply

  • Permalink Gallery

    US encouragement of a military coup in Venezuela is dangerous for both countries

US encouragement of a military coup in Venezuela is dangerous for both countries

Publicly condoning military action and using economic sanctions to provoke it will only exacerbate Venezuelan suffering and further damage the tattered reputation of the US on democracy and human-rights issues in the Western Hemisphere, writes Timothy M. Gill (University of North Carolina, Wilmington).

  • Permalink Gallery

    De los sindicatos a los movimientos sociales, las dinámicas políticas en Sudamérica han seguido un patrón de olas de incorporación

De los sindicatos a los movimientos sociales, las dinámicas políticas en Sudamérica han seguido un patrón de olas de incorporación

La idea de un “giro a la izquierda” dice poco sobre el ascenso y caída de los partidos de izquierda hoy o en cualquier otro momento de la historia de América Latina. Aunque los actores y las arenas varían con el tiempo, la clave está en comprender las sucesivas oleadas de demandas de los segmentos más pobres de la sociedad, […]

From Chávez to Trump, must we really talk about populism?

There has been a surge in academic and media interest in populism, fuelled mainly by the election of Donald Trump. But as misleading comparisons with Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez show, the concept obscures more than it illuminates, while also marginalising any challenge to a dysfunctional “moderate centre”, writes Barry Cannon (Maynooth University).

  • Permalink Venezuelanos vao as urnas neste domingo, 14 de abril de 2013, em Caracas. Foto: Joka Madruga / Futura PressGallery

    What the left must learn from Maduro’s failures in Venezuela

What the left must learn from Maduro’s failures in Venezuela

The inspirational successes of early Chavismo may have blinded broadly pro-Chávez academics like me to later failings and excesses, but the democratic slide under Maduro has been a tipping point, writes Asa Cusack. • n.b. republished courtesy of The Guardian; Creative Commons licence does not apply

  • Permalink Gallery

    From unions to social movements, political dynamics in South America have long been driven by waves of incorporation

From unions to social movements, political dynamics in South America have long been driven by waves of incorporation

The idea of a “Left Turn” or a “Pink Tide” tells us little about the rise and fall of left-wing parties today or throughout Latin America’s history.  Though the actors and arenas vary over time, the key lies in understanding successive waves of demands for incorporation from poorer segments of society, argues Federico M. Rossi (CONICET-Universidad Nacional de General San Martín).

  • Permalink Gallery

    Odebrecht in the Amazon: comparing responses to corruption in Latin America

Odebrecht in the Amazon: comparing responses to corruption in Latin America

The Odebrecht scandal reveals not only the extent of corruption in public contracts and elections in Latin America, but also the widely varying capacity and inclination of different political systems to respond, writes Kathryn Hochstetler.