Academic life

Find out about academic life at LSE through the years with this selection of blog posts about both influential and lesser-known academics and students from LSE’s past, and their lives on campus.

  • Sir William Acworth, 1925 by Walter Stoneman ©NPG
    Permalink Sir William Acworth, 1925 by Walter Stoneman ©NPGGallery

    “No greater living authority upon railway economics and statistics” – Sir William Acworth

“No greater living authority upon railway economics and statistics” – Sir William Acworth

A sign of LSE’s engagement with contemporary life was its early courses in railway economics and administration designed for railway administrators. Sue Donnelly, LSE Archivist, investigates the career of Sir William Acworth, one of the School’s first teachers.

In 1895, LSE’s prospectus listed a series of six lectures on Thursdays at 6.30 beginning on 31 October to be given by […]

  • A Commitment to Welfare
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    A Commitment to Welfare – the impact of Richard Titmuss on health and social policy

A Commitment to Welfare – the impact of Richard Titmuss on health and social policy

On Thursday 22 October 2020, the Departments of Health Policy and Social Policy hosted a celebration of Professor John Stewart’s recent biography of Richard Titmuss, A Commitment to Welfare.

Having joined LSE in 1950, Richard Titmuss was a pioneer of social policy research and an influential figure in Britain’s post-war welfare debates. He almost single-handedly created the academic field […]

Square Haunting – a spotlight on Eileen Power

Between the wars, London’s Mecklenburgh Square was home to five prominent women including LSE economic historian Eileen Power. Square Haunting author Francesca Wade spoke at an LSE Library event on 29 September 2020.

Focusing on Eileen Power, Francesca Wade’s talk was based on her book Square Haunting. Francesca Wade is now Associate Editor of The White Review. Her writing has appeared in […]

Pamela Pigeon – “doing a special job”

On 1 November 2019 GCHQ, the intelligence and security agency responsible for providing communications intelligence to the government and armed forces, marked its centenary. For the first time GCHQ revealed the role of five previously unrevealed sites across the UK in the history of British intelligence. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, investigates the LSE career of one woman destined to […]

  • Dame Cicely Veronica Wedgwood
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    A PhD student at LSE – Dame Cicely Veronica Wedgwood (1910-1997)

A PhD student at LSE – Dame Cicely Veronica Wedgwood (1910-1997)

Despite never holding an academic post Dame Cicely Veronica Wedgwood was a well known and respected historian and public intellectual. “The King’s War” and “The King’s Peace”, published in the 1950s, were widely read by the general public introducing many to the history of the English Civil War. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, investigates Wedgwood’s time as a PhD student […]

  • Staff and students at graduation in December 2006
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    A brief history of Mathematics at LSE – part three 1998-2010

A brief history of Mathematics at LSE – part three 1998-2010

In the final instalment of the mini-series, Norman Biggs concludes his brief history of mathematics at LSE. 
Previous instalments of this brief history have described how LSE recruited a group of mathematicians in 1966 and set up a small Department of Mathematics in 1994. At the start of the 1998-99 session the Department was still small, but hopeful. The Department […]

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    Harold Cecil Edey’s peculiar one-act play about the calculation of income

Harold Cecil Edey’s peculiar one-act play about the calculation of income

Harold Cecil Edey (1913–2007) joined the Department of Accounting as a Lecturer in 1949 and retired as Professor Emeritus in 1980. And, during his thirty-year tenure at the LSE, Edey served as the School’s first Pro-Director in 1967. Today, a portrait of Edey by Sara Rossberg hangs on the walls of the Department of Accounting on the third floor […]

  • close up of a portrait of R H Tawney
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    “An Unpromising Subject” – portrait of R H Tawney by Claude Rogers

“An Unpromising Subject” – portrait of R H Tawney by Claude Rogers

A portrait of the economic historian, R H Tawney, hangs on the 5th floor of Sardinia House. His association with the School lasted nearly 50 years from his arrival in 1913 to his death in 1962, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly.

1950 marked the 70th birthday of Richard Henry Tawney (1880-1962), economic historian and social critic, whose connection with LSE […]

A history of Economics at LSE part two – post-Robbins

In the second of a series charting the history of Economics at LSE, Jim Thomas explores the post-Robbins era from 1961, characterised by the “Americanisation” of Economics. 

The retirement of Lionel Robbins in 1961 led to some confusion over who would replace him as the head of the Department and, observing this as a very junior member of staff, I saw […]

  • Prospectus 1990
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    A brief history of Mathematics at LSE – part two 1988-1998

A brief history of Mathematics at LSE – part two 1988-1998

In the second part of a mini-series, Norman Biggs, Emeritus Professor in the Department of Mathematics, gives a brief history of mathematics at LSE. He covers the structure of the department, the move away from the traditional BSc (Econ), and development of Mathematics as a degree in its own right.

At the start of the academic year 1988/89 the Sub-Department of Mathematics […]