Hidden LSE

Posts about the lesser known and quirky side of LSE’s history.

Remembrance at LSE – the first war memorial

The move to commission, design and erect a First World War memorial was begun by the Students’ Union in 1921, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly. It was unveiled in a ceremony in 1923. 

The Students’ Union is anxious to commemorate those students of the School who fell in the Great War, and propose in the first place to erect a memorial […]

Mackindergarten – LSE’s Army Class

In 1907 LSE and the War Office began an experiment in military education which was to last until 1932, with a break during the First World War. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly introduces LSE’s Army Class.

The experience of the Boer War (1899-1901) created concern about the efficiency of the army and a desire to modernise in some quarters. The class […]

An unsung heroine of LSE – Charlotte Shaw

Accounts of LSE’s foundation and early years are dominated by the personalities of the four people staying at Borough Farm on the morning of 4 August 1894 when Sidney Webb began to outline the idea of establishing a “London school of economics and political science”. One often overlooked key player, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly, is the Irish heiress […]

The Gate of the Year – Minnie Louise Haskins (1875-1957)

Retired LSE academic Minnie Louise Haskins’ famous lines on “the gate of the year” have been used at royal occasions from George VI’s 1939 Christmas broadcast to the funeral of Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in 2002, writes LSE archivist Sue Donnelly. 
And I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year:

“Give me a light that I may […]