Women’s history

Explore women’s history through the lives of women at LSE through the years. 

A London Lecturer at Barnard – Eileen Power and the USA

On Friday 16 March 2018 during the Singularity and Solidarity: Networks of Women at the LSE, 1895–1945  seminar, Rozemarijn van de Wal talked about her ongoing research into economic historian Eileen Power. After having found some new materials in American archives, she shared some of her initial findings in researching Eileen Power’s relationship with the United States of America.

Eileen […]

  • Vera Anstey c1950. Credit: LSE Library
    Permalink Vera Anstey c1950. Credit: LSE LibraryGallery

    Dr Vera Anstey – “so absolutely sane, clear, quick, intelligent & safe”

Dr Vera Anstey – “so absolutely sane, clear, quick, intelligent & safe”

A pencil portrait of Vera Anstey hangs in the lobby of the Vera Anstey Suite in the Old Building. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, writes about the portrait and a woman connected with LSE for 55 years.

Vera Anstey retired in 1964 and following her death in 1976 the Vera Anstey Suite in the Old Building was named in Vera’s honour […]

Women at LSE 1895-1932 – facts and figures

As part of the Singularity and Solidarity: Networks of Women at the LSE, 1895–1945 seminar to mark Women’s History Month, LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, took a look at the first volume of the LSE Register, 1895-1932 to find out more about the women who taught and studied at LSE in its early years.
“The advantages of the School will be […]

24 LSE women in 1918

To mark International Women’s Day LSE’s knitting group designed and created a banner to honour the 24 women who taught at LSE in 1918 – the year women first received the vote. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, explains the inspiration and history behind the design.

The LSE Women 1918 banner is inspired by both the buildings and people of the School. The embroidered […]

Eugenia Charles – DBE, Iron Lady and Mamo

LSE Library’s Sonia Gomes explores Dame Mary Eugenia Charles’ student journey at LSE. Later Dominica’s first female prime minister, Charles came to post-war London to study law in the late 1940s before returning to the Caribbean to set up her own legal practice and, eventually, political party.

Charles was the youngest of four, born in the Caribbean island of Dominica in […]

  • Margaret Lambert. Credit: Compton Verney/Eleanore Breuning
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    Margaret Barbara Lambert (1906-95) – “A thorough and energetic investigator”

Margaret Barbara Lambert (1906-95) – “A thorough and energetic investigator”

Historian Margaret Lambert gained a PhD in international relations at LSE in the 1930s and after the war spent much of her career as an editor-in-chief at the Foreign Office, specialising in contemporary German history. She also collected and wrote about English folk art with her partner, the designer Enid Marx. Dr Clare Taylor explores her fascinating life.

Margaret Lambert […]

Enid Rosser Locket – an early female barrister

Kate Higgins introduces the unpublished memoir of Enid Rosser Locket, LSE alumna and one of the earliest female barristers in England. It is available in the Women’s Library Reading Room at LSE Library. 

Enid wrote her memoir in her old age, but it principally covers her life only until her marriage to the arachnologist George Hazelwood Locket in 1944. Its catalogue […]

  • Beatrice Webb c19196 credit LSE Library
    Permalink Beatrice Webb c19196 credit LSE LibraryGallery

    Beatrice Webb, William Beveridge, Poverty, and the Minority Report on The Poor Law

Beatrice Webb, William Beveridge, Poverty, and the Minority Report on The Poor Law

Ahead of the Beveridge 2.0 event Five LSE Giants’ Perspectives on Poverty, Professor Lucinda Platt explores LSE founder Beatrice Webb’s 1909 Minority Report on the Poor Law, Webb’s views on poor relief and potential influence on William Beveridge. Her report, for which Beveridge was a researcher, called for national and local appropriate coordinated provision for the poor and discussed healthcare, pensions and work. 
Two influential reports
Beatrice Webb’s points of connection […]

  • Flora Drummond and others under arrest, 1914. 7JCCO02065 credit LSE Library
    Permalink Flora Drummond and others under arrest, 1914. 7JCCO02065 credit LSE LibraryGallery

    Was your (great) grandmother a suffragette? Tips for using LSE Library’s resources to trace your ancestors

Was your (great) grandmother a suffragette? Tips for using LSE Library’s resources to trace your ancestors

LSE Library receives many enquiries from people who want to find out more about members of their family who were involved in the suffrage movement. Gillian Murphy looks at some of the resources available at LSE Library which might reveal information about a long-lost relative.

Historical background
The Women’s Library grew out of the work of London Society for Women’s Suffrage […]

  • Bath Abbey Roper stone. Credit: Bath Abbey
    Permalink Bath Abbey Roper stone. Credit: Bath AbbeyGallery

    Margaret and Brian Roper – from LSE to freedom of the City of Bath

Margaret and Brian Roper – from LSE to freedom of the City of Bath

In 2014 LSE alumni Margaret and Brian Roper received the freedom of Bath following years of community work and philanthropy in the city. Hayley Reed explores their lives as LSE students in the 1950s-1960s.
The Ropers in Bath
Margaret and Brian Roper made regular generous donations to organisations across Bath over decades, through their company Roper Rhodes and the Roper Family Charitable Trust.

Brian received an MBE in […]