Women’s history

Explore women’s history through the lives of women at LSE through the years. 

Eugenia Charles – DBE, Iron Lady and Mamo

LSE Library’s Sonia Gomes explores Dame Mary Eugenia Charles’ student journey at LSE. Later Dominica’s first female prime minister, Charles came to post-war London to study law in the late 1940s before returning to the Caribbean to set up her own legal practice and, eventually, political party.

Charles was the youngest of four, born in the Caribbean island of Dominica in […]

  • Margaret Lambert. Credit: Compton Verney/Eleanore Breuning
    Permalink Margaret Lambert. Credit: Compton Verney/Eleanore BreuningGallery

    Margaret Barbara Lambert (1906-95) – “A thorough and energetic investigator”

Margaret Barbara Lambert (1906-95) – “A thorough and energetic investigator”

Historian Margaret Lambert gained a PhD in international relations at LSE in the 1930s and after the war spent much of her career as an editor-in-chief at the Foreign Office, specialising in contemporary German history. She also collected and wrote about English folk art with her partner, the designer Enid Marx. Dr Clare Taylor explores her fascinating life.

Margaret Lambert […]

Enid Rosser Locket – an early female barrister

Kate Higgins introduces the unpublished memoir of Enid Rosser Locket, LSE alumna and one of the earliest female barristers in England. It is available in the Women’s Library Reading Room at LSE Library. 

Enid wrote her memoir in her old age, but it principally covers her life only until her marriage to the arachnologist George Hazelwood Locket in 1944. Its catalogue […]

  • Beatrice Webb c19196 credit LSE Library
    Permalink Beatrice Webb c19196 credit LSE LibraryGallery

    Beatrice Webb, William Beveridge, Poverty, and the Minority Report on The Poor Law

Beatrice Webb, William Beveridge, Poverty, and the Minority Report on The Poor Law

Ahead of the Beveridge 2.0 event Five LSE Giants’ Perspectives on Poverty, Professor Lucinda Platt explores LSE founder Beatrice Webb’s 1909 Minority Report on the Poor Law, Webb’s views on poor relief and potential influence on William Beveridge. Her report, for which Beveridge was a researcher, called for national and local appropriate coordinated provision for the poor and discussed healthcare, pensions and work. 
Two influential reports
Beatrice Webb’s points of connection […]

  • Flora Drummond and others under arrest, 1914. 7JCCO02065 credit LSE Library
    Permalink Flora Drummond and others under arrest, 1914. 7JCCO02065 credit LSE LibraryGallery

    Was your (great) grandmother a suffragette? Tips for using LSE Library’s resources to trace your ancestors

Was your (great) grandmother a suffragette? Tips for using LSE Library’s resources to trace your ancestors

LSE Library receives many enquiries from people who want to find out more about members of their family who were involved in the suffrage movement. Gillian Murphy looks at some of the resources available at LSE Library which might reveal information about a long-lost relative.

Historical background
The Women’s Library grew out of the work of London Society for Women’s Suffrage […]

  • Bath Abbey Roper stone. Credit: Bath Abbey
    Permalink Bath Abbey Roper stone. Credit: Bath AbbeyGallery

    Margaret and Brian Roper – from LSE to freedom of the City of Bath

Margaret and Brian Roper – from LSE to freedom of the City of Bath

In 2014 LSE alumni Margaret and Brian Roper received the freedom of Bath following years of community work and philanthropy in the city. Hayley Reed explores their lives as LSE students in the 1950s-1960s.
The Ropers in Bath
Margaret and Brian Roper made regular generous donations to organisations across Bath over decades, through their company Roper Rhodes and the Roper Family Charitable Trust.

Brian received an MBE in […]

Beatrice Serota – politician and social reformer

The politician and social reformer Beatrice Serota (1919-2002) both studied and taught at LSE and later became an Honorary Fellow. She is best known for her career in government, championing an inclusive approach to social policy. LSE Curator Gillian Murphy introduces LSE Library’s archive collection covering Beatrice Serota’s working life.

Beatrice Serota was born on 15 October 1919 in London. She attended Clapton […]

Sydney Mary Bushell, 1880-1959

Sydney Mary Bushell made significant contributions to the field of housing in the 1920s, particularly women’s housing, with the Garden City and Town Planning Association and Women’s Pioneer Housing. Born in Greenwich and raised in Liverpool and Formby, Sydney attended the North London Collegiate School for Girls. After working as a welder in the First World War, Sydney enrolled […]

Women in art – the Shaw Library

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly takes a trip to the Shaw Library to find out more about some of the women who created or feature in LSE art works. The Shaw Library (once known as the Founders’ Room) opened in 1928 and today its art works represent significant figures in the history of the School.
Beatrice and Sidney Webb (1928) by William Nicholson
The […]

  • Anne Bohm, 1948
    Permalink Anne Bohm, 1948Gallery

    “A melange of charm, beauty and pure terror” – Anne Bohm (1910-2006), Secretary to the Graduate School

“A melange of charm, beauty and pure terror” – Anne Bohm (1910-2006), Secretary to the Graduate School

LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly looks back at Anne Bohm, who was secretary to the Graduate School and a roving ambassador for the School.

In the second half of the 20th century one woman was a constant presence at LSE – Anne Bohm.

Anne Bohm was born in Breslau (now […]