Women’s history

Explore women’s history through the lives of women at LSE through the years. 

Beatrice Serota – politician and social reformer

The politician and social reformer Beatrice Serota (1919-2002) both studied and taught at LSE and later became an Honorary Fellow. She is best known for her career in government, championing an inclusive approach to social policy. LSE Curator Gillian Murphy introduces LSE Library’s archive collection covering Beatrice Serota’s working life.

Beatrice Serota was born on 15 October 1919 in London. She attended Clapton […]

Sydney Mary Bushell, 1880-1959

Sydney Mary Bushell made significant contributions to the field of housing in the 1920s, particularly women’s housing, with the Garden City and Town Planning Association and Women’s Pioneer Housing. Born in Greenwich and raised in Liverpool and Formby, Sydney attended the North London Collegiate School for Girls. After working as a welder in the First World War, Sydney enrolled […]

Women in art – the Shaw Library

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly takes a trip to the Shaw Library to find out more about some of the women who created or feature in LSE art works. The Shaw Library (once known as the Founders’ Room) opened in 1928 and today its art works represent significant figures in the history of the School.
Beatrice and Sidney Webb (1928) by William Nicholson
The […]

  • Anne Bohm, 1948
    Permalink Anne Bohm, 1948Gallery

    “A melange of charm, beauty and pure terror” – Anne Bohm (1910-2006), Secretary to the Graduate School

“A melange of charm, beauty and pure terror” – Anne Bohm (1910-2006), Secretary to the Graduate School

LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly looks back at Anne Bohm, who was secretary to the Graduate School and a roving ambassador for the School.

In the second half of the 20th century one woman was a constant presence at LSE – Anne Bohm.

Anne Bohm was born in Breslau (now […]

Anne Barbara Page “The ablest woman I have ever known”

LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. LSE’s Candy Gibson looks back at her great aunt, Anne Barbara Page, who graduated from LSE in 1912 with a First Class Honours degree in Economics. Anne Barbara (Nancy) went on to work as private secretary for Sir Arthur Steel-Maitland, a Conservative Party Chairman and […]

A life of social work and friends – Eileen Younghusband

Highly respected outside of LSE,  Eileen Younghusband’s career in social work education began in the 1930s and continued till her death in 1981. She had never obtained a degree and was never a senior lecturer, reader or professor. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly looks back at the life of Eileen Younghusband, whose career illustrates a network of women whose professional and personal lives […]

Eslanda Robeson – acting, activism, Africa and LSE

Following her review of Paul Robeson: the artist as revolutionary by Gerald Horne at the LSE Review of Books, Howard University’s Sherese R Taylor introduces the life of Eslanda Robeson, who studied at LSE in the 1930s.

Eslanda Cordozo Goode Robeson, also known as Essie, was an anti-racist, anti-colonialist, anti-capitalist, and feminist born in Washington, DC on 15 December 1895. She received a […]

The ‘hidden’ women of LSE

LSE Centennial Professor Mary Evans charts the history of women at LSE and the changing attitudes towards gender in higher education and society that occurred throughout LSE’s early decades. 

LSE opened in 1895 and among its famous founders were Beatrice Webb and Sidney Webb. Much less well known among those who contributed to the funds for the School was Charlotte Payne Townshend, the wife of George Bernard […]

The Women’s Library at 90

LSE’s Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science, opened in November 1896. In a series of posts celebrating LSE Library’s 120th anniversary in 2016, Gillian Murphy tells the story of The Women’s Library at LSE, which is celebrating its 90th anniversary this year.

The origins of The Women’s Library can be traced back to the suffrage movement. Out of the 1866 Women’s Suffrage […]

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    Ellen Marianne Leonard – President of the Students’ Union, 1907

Ellen Marianne Leonard – President of the Students’ Union, 1907

LSE’s History series for LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. Sue Donnelly looks back at Ellen Marianne Leonard: first woman President of the LSE Students’ Union. 

In 1907 the LSE Students’ Union elected its first woman President, also known as the Chairman of the Common Rooms Committee. Ellen Marianne Leonard (1866-1953) was a 41 year […]