Women’s history

Explore women’s history through the lives of women at LSE through the years. 

Anne Barbara Page “The ablest woman I have ever known”

LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. LSE’s Candy Gibson looks back at her great aunt, Anne Barbara Page, who graduated from LSE in 1912 with a First Class Honours degree in Economics. Anne Barbara (Nancy) went on to work as private secretary for Sir Arthur Steel-Maitland, a Conservative Party Chairman and […]

A life of social work and friends – Eileen Younghusband

Highly respected outside of LSE,  Eileen Younghusband’s career in social work education began in the 1930s and continued till her death in 1981. She had never obtained a degree and was never a senior lecturer, reader or professor. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly looks back at the life of Eileen Younghusband, whose career illustrates a network of women whose professional and personal lives […]

Eslanda Robeson – acting, activism, Africa and LSE

Following her review of Paul Robeson: the artist as revolutionary by Gerald Horne at the LSE Review of Books, Howard University’s Sherese R Taylor introduces the life of Eslanda Robeson, who studied at LSE in the 1930s.

Eslanda Cordozo Goode Robeson, also known as Essie, was an anti-racist, anti-colonialist, anti-capitalist, and feminist born in Washington, DC on 15 December 1895. She received a […]

The ‘hidden’ women of LSE

LSE Centennial Professor Mary Evans charts the history of women at LSE and the changing attitudes towards gender in higher education and society that occurred throughout LSE’s early decades. 

LSE opened in 1895 and among its famous founders were Beatrice Webb and Sidney Webb. Much less well known among those who contributed to the funds for the School was Charlotte Payne Townshend, the wife of George Bernard […]

The Women’s Library at 90

LSE’s Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science, opened in November 1896. In a series of posts celebrating LSE Library’s 120th anniversary in 2016, Gillian Murphy tells the story of The Women’s Library at LSE, which is celebrating its 90th anniversary this year.

The origins of The Women’s Library can be traced back to the suffrage movement. Out of the 1866 Women’s Suffrage […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Ellen Marianne Leonard – President of the Students’ Union, 1907

Ellen Marianne Leonard – President of the Students’ Union, 1907

LSE’s History series for LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. Sue Donnelly looks back at Ellen Marianne Leonard: first woman President of the LSE Students’ Union. 

In 1907 the LSE Students’ Union elected its first woman President, also known as the Chairman of the Common Rooms Committee. Ellen Marianne Leonard (1866-1953) was a 41 year […]

Audrey Richards – a career in Anthropology

LSE’s History series for LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. Adam Kuper looks back at  Audrey Richards: LSE alumna and anthropologist. 

Unprejudiced, unshockable, in many ways unconventional, Audrey Richards nevertheless operated unselfconsciously by the standards of her parents and their class.

Born in London in 1899, Audrey was the second daughter of Henry Erle and Isabel Richards. […]

  • Permalink Clara Collet and Beatrice WebbGallery

    Beatrice Webb, Clara Collet and Charles Booth’s Survey of London

Beatrice Webb, Clara Collet and Charles Booth’s Survey of London

Inderbir Bhullar, LSE Library, shares the story of the women behind Charles Booth’s Survey of London. Posts about LSE’s Library explore the history of the Library and its collections.

At LSE, we’re fortunate to have a fascinating collection of material from what is often referred to as the Charles Booth Survey of London. This survey and all the laboriously collected data which […]

  • Margaret Gowing
    Permalink Margaret GowingGallery

    “A decided bent for economic history” – Margaret Gowing, historian, civil servant and academic

“A decided bent for economic history” – Margaret Gowing, historian, civil servant and academic

LSE’s History series for LSE Women: making history celebrates some of the notable women at LSE through the years. Sue Donnelly looks back at Margaret Gowing: LSE alumna, civil servant and academic. 

The historian Margaret Gowing (1921-1998) was the author of histories of the Second World War and the UK’s nuclear power and nuclear deterrent capacity. In a 1988 letter to LSE Director I […]

Baroness Stocks – economist and activist

Mary Danvers Stocks was a life-long activist. A teenage member of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, she went on to achieve a first class BSc in Economics from LSE then taught at the School during the First World War. As well as an extensive academic career, she campaigned for issues from the ordination of women priests and equal pay to […]