• The Unregistered History of LSE

The Unregistered History of LSE

  • May 16th, 2018

Catherine McIntyre introduces the LSE/Unregistered collection, an archive of LSE’s own history that is available to researchers using the archives at LSE.

As well as holding the archives of external collections from organisations and individuals, LSE Library also holds the historical records of LSE itself. LSE/UNREGISTERED contains a wide variety of documents that are outside of the School’s administrative system and therefore not […]

  • Sporting prowess – The Ernest Cornwall Cup

Sporting prowess – The Ernest Cornwall Cup

The Ernest Cornwall Cup is a reminder of sporting prowess at LSE in the 1930s-1960s, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly.

Sport was a significant aspect of LSE life between the two world wars. William Beveridge, LSE Director from 1919-1937, was a keen badminton and tennis player and oversaw the purchase of the School’s sports ground at New Malden, with the […]

  • LSE in the American Century

LSE in the American Century

  • February 9th, 2017

There has long been has been an overlap between the history of LSE and the USA, often personified in well-known individuals like JFK and Rockefeller. In this episode of podcast series The Ballpark, LSE’s United States Centre uncovers the real relationship between Americans, London and LSE.

 

Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS, believes LSE has helped shape the United States, and in turn Americans have […]

  • Sociology and the Gay Liberation Front – Bob Mellors at LSE

Sociology and the Gay Liberation Front – Bob Mellors at LSE

On 14 October 1970 the first UK meeting of the Gay Liberation Front was held in an LSE classroom. The room was booked by Bob Mellors, a second year Sociology student. The story is told by LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly.

Bob Mellors was born on 28 October 1949 and came to LSE from Bramcote Hill Grammar School in Nottingham doing […]

  • Glad to be gay – the Hall-Carpenter Archives at LSE Library

Glad to be gay – the Hall-Carpenter Archives at LSE Library

LSE Library has been home to the Hall-Carpenter Archives since 1988. It’s an extensive collection of archives, ephemera and printed material documenting the development of gay activism in the UK since the 1950s. But how did it come to LSE and what does it hold? Curator Gillian Murphy introduces the collection. Visit the free exhibition Glad to be Gay.

 
The origins
The […]

  • The world below – archaeology at LSE

The world below – archaeology at LSE

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly writes about this Spring’s archaeological dig on Houghton Street at LSE.

London’s many building sites are the source of frequent disruption and irritation but they also provide opportunities to find out more about the history hidden beneath the buildings and streets. The preparatory works for the Centre Buildings Redevelopment was an opportunity to discover what lies […]

  • The ‘hidden’ women of LSE

The ‘hidden’ women of LSE

  • July 14th, 2016

LSE Centennial Professor Mary Evans charts the history of women at LSE and the changing attitudes towards gender in higher education and society that occurred throughout LSE’s early decades. 

LSE opened in 1895 and among its famous founders were Beatrice Webb and Sidney Webb. Much less well known among those who contributed to the funds for the School was Charlotte Payne Townshend, the wife of George Bernard […]

  • Making an LSE oral history

Making an LSE oral history

  • April 8th, 2016

Clara Cook shares her experience making an LSE oral history. The Tales from Houghton Street podcast and collection are now available at LSE’s Digital Library. 

The first recording I ever made of someone’s voice was when I was 2 years old. I held out a tape recorder to my mother and asked her to say the words ‘peanut butter.’ Since then I have […]

  • LSE on the big and the small screen

LSE on the big and the small screen

Sir Mark Spencer, special advisor to the Prime Minister: [intending to dupe Hacker into taking a thankless job] But Sir Humphrey Appleby is bound to tell Hacker he’d be crazy to take it on.

Sir Arnold Robinson, Cabinet Secretary: Yes. “Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes”, I can hear him say. “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts”, roughly translated. Though Humphrey would […]

  • LSE history trivia – did you know?

LSE history trivia – did you know?

  • December 30th, 2015

How well do you know your LSE history trivia? Here are 38 facts you probably didn’t know about LSE, originally released during LSE’s 120th anniversary celebrations in 2015:

1. King George VI’s 1939 Christmas broadcast contained a poem by an LSE teacher

Find out more about Minnie Louise Haskins, author of The Gate of the Year which is a preamble to the poem God Knows.

2. […]

  • Funding the vision – Henry Hunt Hutchinson and his will

Funding the vision – Henry Hunt Hutchinson and his will

  • September 30th, 2015

How did the will of a Derby lawyer lead to the foundation of the London School of Economics and Political Science? LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly finds out.

On 2 August 1894 a Derby attorney, William Harvey Whiston, wrote to Sidney Webb. The letter enclosed the will of Derby lawyer Henry Hutchinson and stated that the value of the estate was […]

  • Ghosts of the Past

Ghosts of the Past

Ghosts of the Past combines old and new, providing a glimpse into how different – or indeed how similar – LSE of the past was to LSE today.
This photo gallery was created by LSE’s Design Unit and School Photographer Nigel Stead for the LSE Space for Thought Literary Festival 2015. The archive photos used are from the popular LSE Library Flickr […]

  • “A Life of Adventure” – LSE at 120

“A Life of Adventure” – LSE at 120

“The life of the School has always been a life of adventure”

William Beveridge, Director of LSE from 1919 to 1937, uttered those words in 1930, when the university was a mere 35 years old.

Fast forward to the present. It’s been 85 years since Beveridge’s speech and 120 years since the university first opened its doors. But the adventure hasn’t […]

  • A royal visit – laying the foundation stone of the Old Building

A royal visit – laying the foundation stone of the Old Building

  • May 27th, 2015

On 28 May 1920 George V and Queen Mary left Buckingham Palace in an open carriage escorted by the Life Guards, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly. They were accompanied by Herbert Fisher, Minister for Education and as they approached St Clement Danes the church bells began to ring. Halting on Clare Market the royal party entered Passmore Edwards Hall […]

  • Suffragettes and LSE – early neighbours

Suffragettes and LSE – early neighbours

Now home to LSE, 20 Kingsway used to house the Tea Cup Inn – a tea shop for suffragettes. The offices of the Women’s Social and Political Union were at Clement’s Inn and their newspaper printed at the St Clement’s Press on Clare Market. Hayley Reed finds that if you look closely traces of the suffragettes, LSE’s early neighbours, can still […]

  • As others see us – LSE in fiction

As others see us – LSE in fiction

LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly introduces some works of fiction that reference LSE, including Pygmalion, a play for LSE co-founder George Bernard Shaw.
For the last three months an idea has haunted me that after we have ended our stiff work on Trade Unions I would try my hand at pure ‘Fiction’ in the form of a novel dated “60 years […]

  • A piece of LGBT+ history at LSE

A piece of LGBT+ history at LSE

This LGBT History Month, find out about the history of the gay rights movement at LSE, the foundation of the present day staff LGBT+ network, and how to research LGBT history using our archive collections.
The GLF at LSE
On 13 October 1970 the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) met for the first time in the UK – in a classroom in LSE’s […]

  • LSE’s sustainability journey

LSE’s sustainability journey

  • December 10th, 2014

LSE Sustainability Officer Jon Emmett introduces LSE’s sustainability journey 2004 to 2014.

“It’s not enough to have a general idea.  You must also know how to put it into practice.” These were the words of William Beveridge (LSE Director, 1919-1937) in a speech to LSE students in 1931, where he argued that rigorous study of the social sciences should be […]

  • Lest we forget 1914-1918 – LSE’s First World War roll of honour

Lest we forget 1914-1918 – LSE’s First World War roll of honour

  • November 11th, 2014

The LSE war memorial hangs alongside the Old Theatre in Old Building and lists the names of 70 staff and students who lost their lives in the First World War, writes LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly. Seventy lives telling seventy stories.

Between 1914 and 1918 the School Governors received regular reports of staff and students who had enlisted, received honours and […]