Meet some of the people from LSE’s past.

  • Conjectures and refutations – Karl Popper and the growth of LSE Philosophy

Conjectures and refutations – Karl Popper and the growth of LSE Philosophy

  • March 20th, 2019

2019 marks the 70th anniversary of the promotion to Professor of the hugely influential philosopher, and founder of LSE’s Philosophy Department, Karl Popper. To celebrate this event Ewan Rodgers goes back to the archives to trace the story of LSE’s earliest forays into philosophy and the historical events that gave birth to the now world-renowned Department of Philosophy, Logic […]

  • Unfailing equanimity – Eve Evans, School Secretary 1940-1954

Unfailing equanimity – Eve Evans, School Secretary 1940-1954

  • March 18th, 2019

Between 1896 and 1954 the role of School Secretary, the senior administrator in the School, was held by three women apart from a brief period between 1938-1940. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, looks at the career of the last of these women, Eve Evans (1894-1971) who worked at the School from 1920 to 1954.

At the end of summer term 1954 […]

  • Maureen Colquhoun – first openly gay woman in Parliament

Maureen Colquhoun – first openly gay woman in Parliament

  • February 13th, 2019

Women’s rights activist and former Labour Member of Parliament for Northampton North Maureen Colquhoun was elected to the House of Commons in 1974. She became the first openly gay woman to serve in Parliament after coming out a year later, write Louise Armitage and Megan Marsh. Maureen studied at LSE in the mid-late 1940s and served as a local councillor […]

  • Meet Beatrice Webb – LSE co-founder and social reformer

Meet Beatrice Webb – LSE co-founder and social reformer

  • January 22nd, 2019

Blog editor Hayley Reed introduces Beatrice Webb (1858-1943), one of the four founders of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Born 22 January 1858, Beatrice Webb (nee Potter) became a leading social reformer, Fabian Society member, co-founder of LSE and prolific diarist. Her diaries are available at the LSE Digital Library.
Early years
Beatrice’s accomplishments are a testament to her […]

  • #LSEWomen in the Commons – a history of female LSE graduates elected to the House of Commons

#LSEWomen in the Commons – a history of female LSE graduates elected to the House of Commons

  • December 27th, 2018

The history of female LSE graduates who have been elected to the House of Commons is long and illustrious. LSE’s Greg Taylor introduces a series of women who blazed a political trail, challenged the patriarchy and stuffy rigidity of Westminster, and represented their local areas with passion and commitment.

The first LSE alumna to be elected was Marion Philips, who served the […]

  • Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, LSE and the origins of International Relations

Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, LSE and the origins of International Relations

  • December 12th, 2018

Over the past few years there has been renewed scholarly interest in the early history of the discipline of International Relations (IR) and the seminal role played by such figures as E H Carr, Hans J Morgenthau and key liberal theorists who helped build the foundations upon which the subject of IR came to be constructed in the twentieth century. Professor […]

  • Hilde Himmelweit – pioneer of social psychology

Hilde Himmelweit – pioneer of social psychology

  • November 28th, 2018

In the mid 1960s Social Psychology emerged from Sociology as an independent department – the precursor of today’s Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, looks at the career of Hilde Himmelweit who led the discipline through its formative years at LSE.

Hildegarde Therese Litthauer was born in Berlin on 20 February 1918. Her father, Dr Siegfried […]

  • A mother and daughter at LSE – Herabai and Mithan Tata

A mother and daughter at LSE – Herabai and Mithan Tata

LSE often runs in the family with several generations making their way to Houghton Street. LSE Archivist Sue Donnelly writes about an unusual mother and daughter duo.

In 1919 a young Indian woman, Mithan Ardeshir Tata enrolled to study at LSE. Mithan was born in 1898 into a Parsi family in Mumbai (then known as Bombay), the daughter of Herabai […]

  • Lilian Knowles (1870-1926) – the pioneer

Lilian Knowles (1870-1926) – the pioneer

  • October 24th, 2018

Jennie Stayner introduces pioneering female academic Lilian Knowles, first female professor of Economic History at LSE, and first female Dean of Faculty in the University of London.
Intentionally or unintentionally, it seemed to be her lot to be breaking down barriers.
C M Knowles
Lilian Charlotte Anne Knowles (Tomn) was born in 1870 in Cornwall and spent a happy childhood riding horses and winning […]

  • Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972) – a term at LSE

Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972) – a term at LSE

In 1952 Kwame Nkrumah became Prime Minister of the Gold Coast and in 1957 the country gained its independence under the new name of Ghana. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, writes about Nkrumah’s brief time at LSE.

Kwame Nkrumah was born in Nkroful on the Gold Coast in 1909. The precise date of his birth is unknown but he usually gave […]

  • Lucy Philip Mair – leading writer on colonial administration, early international relations scholar, and anthropologist

Lucy Philip Mair – leading writer on colonial administration, early international relations scholar, and anthropologist

  • October 3rd, 2018

Lucy Philip Mair was a well-known anthropologist at LSE; she is far less known for her significant contributions to the history of the discipline of International Relations. Professor Patricia Owens, director of a new Leverhulme project on the history of women’s international thought, highlights this neglected, early aspect of Lucy Mair’s academic life.

Lucy Philip Mair was born on 28 […]

  • Susan Strange – world renowned international relations scholar

Susan Strange – world renowned international relations scholar

  • September 19th, 2018

Susan Strange held the Montague Burton Chair in International Relations 1978-88 and was a world renowned leader of the field, writes Professor Patricia Owens of the University of Sussex. Susan Strange had studied at LSE and become a journalist before returning to academia. As a professor at LSE, she published her most influential books and founded the British International Studies Association. Later, she became […]

  • “Exceptional and outstanding qualities” – Professor Ragnhild Hatton (1913-1995)

“Exceptional and outstanding qualities” – Professor Ragnhild Hatton (1913-1995)

  • September 12th, 2018

For 32 years Ragnhild Hatton was a member of the International History Department. LSE Archivist, Sue Donnelly, investigates her career as a historian and teacher of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Ragnhild Hatton was born in Bergen, Norway in 1913. Her family was well to do with links to Bergen’s shipping interests, but her father, Gustav Ingolf Hanssen was an […]

  • “A pillar of the department” – Sally Sainsbury at LSE

“A pillar of the department” – Sally Sainsbury at LSE

  • September 5th, 2018

Sally Sainsbury completed the Diploma Social Policy and Administration at LSE in 1963, before joining the Department of Social Administration to become a research assistant and a teacher. She established herself a leader in the field of disability and social policy and retired as Emeritus Reader in Social Administration, Department of Social Policy. Here, Professor David Piachaud remembers a dedicated, unstinting […]

  • Once upon a time… when Jomo Kenyatta was a student at LSE

Once upon a time… when Jomo Kenyatta was a student at LSE

  • August 15th, 2018

Victoria de Menil revisits the politics of Jomo Kenyatta’s supposedly de-political master’s thesis, later published as Facing Mount Kenya, particularly in relation to land and female circumcision. She asks who the intended audience was, and what legacy the book has left behind.
Once upon a time an elephant made a friendship with a man. One day a heavy thunderstorm broke […]

  • Alice Clark – a suffragist from LSE

Alice Clark – a suffragist from LSE

  • July 25th, 2018

Somerset-born Alice Clark came from a family of pacifist shoe-makers who were involved in the suffrage movement. LSE curator Gillian Murphy finds that Alice Clark also held a Shaw Research Studentship in economic history at LSE.

Alice Clark, daughter of Helen and William Clark, was born in Street in Somerset in 1874. She was a Quaker by birth, and also a Liberal, and her family were […]

  • Alice Paul – a suffragette from LSE

Alice Paul – a suffragette from LSE

  • July 18th, 2018

American Alice Paul became a “convert” to the suffragette cause after hearing a talk by Christabel Pankhurst. LSE curator Gillian Murphy charts Alice Paul’s suffragette activities in England and as a student at LSE.

“She will die, but she will never give up” commented the psychiatrist called to evaluate Alice Paul’s mental condition when she was in an American prison in […]

  • Theodore Gregory and early Economics at LSE

Theodore Gregory and early Economics at LSE

Sir Theodore Gregory (1890-1970) could be said to epitomise LSE. A student and member of staff from 1910 to 1937, he was international in outlook; interested in theory, practice and history; a gifted teacher; and valued by governments and institutions across the world, writes Robert Bigg. Gregory was, appropriately, one of the inaugural Honorary Fellows of the School in 1958.

Theodor […]

  • Lionel Robbins and the Library Appeal

Lionel Robbins and the Library Appeal

  • July 4th, 2018

2018 is the 40th anniversary of the Lionel Robbins Building, which houses LSE Library – the British Library of Political and Economic Science. Lionel Robbins led the appeal to fund a new building for the Library, which opened in 1978. Kathryn Hannan explored the story while cataloguing the Lionel Robbins Papers at LSE Library.

Lionel Robbins’ long history with LSE, as […]

  • Fred Halliday at LSE

Fred Halliday at LSE

  • June 13th, 2018

LSE Library holds the papers of the late Fred Halliday (1946-2010), former Professor of International Relations at LSE, writes Ben Martill. Fred Halliday had long ties to the School and a formidable reputation both in research and as a public intellectual.
About the Fred Halliday collection
The collection consists of over 350 files of personal effects, correspondence, memoirs, draft texts, travel-notes and work documents, […]