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Gender & International History

On 11 May, the International History Department hosted a workshop led by PhD students on integrating gender into historical research. As a PhD student in the throes of conducting historical research on women’s rights myself, I naturally jumped at the chance to hear from experts in the gender history field about their current research. But this conference wasn’t just […]

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    Regulating Religious Rites: Did British Regulation of ‘Noise Worship’ Trigger the 1915 Riots in Ceylon?

Regulating Religious Rites: Did British Regulation of ‘Noise Worship’ Trigger the 1915 Riots in Ceylon?

Violence targeting the Muslim community has recently increased in Sri Lanka. The latest outbreak of violence occurred in March 2018. An isolated traffic dispute between a group of Muslims and a Sinhalese man led to the death of the Sinhalese man. In retaliation for the death, militant groups incited others to commit violence against Muslims. Sinhala-Buddhist mobs subsequently attacked […]

March 31st, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Violence and Peace: The Rhetoric of Death in Social Movement Discourse

This piece intends to discuss a specific rhetoric of death and killings in academic commentary on social movements, some of which emerged in popular scholarship following the publication and subsequent retraction of a controversial article by Bruce Gilly. Senior scholars have already issued reasoned critiques of the original article itself.

In October 2017, an article hailing the benefits of colonialism appeared […]

January 11th, 2018|Uncategorized|1 Comment|

“Brexit 1967”: Britain’s retreat from empire and Cold War Southeast Asia

The past is littered with Brexits. Indeed, episodes of Great Britain’s retreat from its empire multiplied after 1945. Repeatedly, and across the world, Britain’s retrenchment distressed its allies while encouraging other powers to ponder filling the vacuums Britain left behind.

The tremors in the international order produced by last June’s UK referendum vote to leave the European Union resemble, but […]

December 13th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Conflict and Identity in Europe since the 18th Century

The Department of International History research cluster ‘Conflict and Identity in Europe since the Eighteenth Century’ met on Thursday 23 November to discuss The Internationalists: And Their Plan to Outlaw War (London and New York: Allen Lane, 2017), a new book by Oona A. Hathaway and Scott Shapiro, both of whom are scholars of international law at Yale University. […]

December 12th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

LSE Library Archives and the Russian Revolution

This November (October in the Julian calendar) marks the centenary of the second of the 1917 Russian Revolutions, when the Bolsheviks overthrew the Provisional Government, and established a federal government and the world’s first socialist republic. This was the result of several months of power struggles, after the sudden collapse of the Tsarist autocracy and the abdication of Nicholas […]

November 2nd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

The Catalan Crisis: Free Choice?

Many are asking whether the Catalan people have a choice – a right to self-determination. The more pertinent question, however, relates to Spain’s options. While negotiation is clearly one, Madrid would appear to assume that it has another: flat denial of Catalonian claims.

Historically, denial has been a standard approach adopted by central governments faced with dissatisfied regions. Serbia was […]

October 20th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

A brief history of chemical warfare: from Sparta to Syria

William King gives a historical overview of chemical warfare. 

The assassination of Kim Jong-nam with VX on 13 February and the recurrent use of Sarin against civilians in the Syrian conflict have thrust chemical warfare agents back in the international spotlight. What are these agents, and where did they originally come from? How does their recent use fit within the […]

April 25th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Japanese Immigration and the Dark Prehistory of Donald Trump’s Muslim Ban

In this piece, Dr Cees Heere explores the historical precedents of Donald Trump’s recent travel ban. 

Author’s note: I wrote this article in an effort to make sense of the ban on immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries to the United States, announced on 27 January 2017. The revised order introduced on 6 March remedies some of the original’s more obvious […]

March 14th, 2017|Uncategorized|1 Comment|

We’re All in “It” Together: Without Votes at Work, People’s Wages Are Pressed to the Minimum Wall

In this timely piece, Dr Ewan McGaughey writes about the Conservative Party’s most recent labour policies. Seen historically, he argues that there is little new about these policies. History shows when more people are earning middle incomes, when most people are not pressed toward the minimum, and when the top-earners are not taking ‘other people’s money’ there is greater […]

September 15th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments|