Referencing I’m sure you all know can be the most tedious part when writing in academia. Where did I find that quote? Where did I store that reading? Why does it take so long? Are a few of my thoughts when referencing. I’m sure they’re relatable, notably as we scurry through our notes, trying to quickly assemble some references and a bibliography as the deadline for that essay approaches.

Referencing doesn’t have to be all that bad, especially with the tips and tricks of these apps that have made my academia much more easier!

Pocket

pocket logo

https://www.flickr.com/people/downloadsourcefr/

This app will collate all those articles, images and videos you find online.
Prominent features include:
• Available on all devices
• Automatically syncs all content you’ve saved
• Able to add tags to findings, making it more convenient to find that article you read a few weeks ago
• You can choose what findings to share with people (Handy in group research)
• You can follow people in times of need in inspiration. Or alternatively have followers
This app is more than just a bookmark. It’s a place of inspiration and organisation of all those findings you discover online
It has a premium, but all the features mentioned above are available for free.
Rating 3/5
Perhaps it’s limitations is rather than using tags, it could have a folder option that could organise your findings in a more efficient manner.

RefMelogo
The referencing app that has made our lives so much more easier.
Prominent features include:
• Available on all devices
• You can scan the barcodes of books and articles to have the reference added to your list
• Enter website readings
• Option to enter manually
• Add quotes and annotations to any readings you discover
• Create different lists for each project you do
• Able to share with others (yet again handy for group research)
• Don’t use Harvard referencing style? Fear not as it adjusts to every style.
• WebClipper feature that enables you to cite online resources, directly from your browser.
• It’s free!
Rating 5/5
If there’s something to take away from this blog post, it would have to be trying out this app. How can you fault it? It’s pretty exhaustive and extensive in it’s abilities to make referencing easier and convenient for you when doing academia. By Rebecca Quinn

Sonia Gomes

About Sonia Gomes

Sonia is the Learning Support Library Assistant for LSE’s Library Information Skills programmes as well as the Student Ambassador for Digital Literacy project (SADL). She has worked with LSE Archives and Special Collections and has a special interest in collections such as The Women's Library and the Hall-Carpenter Archives.