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    GV262 Blog Post Winner #3: ‘You’ve Been Hacked: A Marcusian Analysis of Addictive Technologies’

GV262 Blog Post Winner #3: ‘You’ve Been Hacked: A Marcusian Analysis of Addictive Technologies’

Written by: David Abadir

More than just selling you things you don’t need, the latest stage of our consumer capitalism has reached a new frontier by commodifying your most valuable intangibles: your time and attention. Tech companies, particularly those that operate at no monetary cost to the user, have invested heavily in developing a sophisticated arsenal to coerce you to […]

February 5th, 2021|Articles, Featured|0 Comments|

GV262 Blog Post Winner #2: ‘Prevent and the Panopticon’

Written by: Anna Kayani

Section 29 of the Counterterrorism and Security Act, enacted in 2015, is known as the ‘Prevent Duty’. This duty is legally incumbent on public sector workers at schools, nurseries, universities and other institutions, who are trained to identify and report signs of ‘radicalisation’ and ‘extremism’. To this end, the Prevent strategy has overtly sought to engage […]

February 3rd, 2021|Articles, Featured|0 Comments|
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    GV262 Blog Post Winner #1: ‘Hong Kong and Trump: My Opposing Encumbrances’

GV262 Blog Post Winner #1: ‘Hong Kong and Trump: My Opposing Encumbrances’

Written by: Ching Ya Ho

I stand for reproductive rights, trans rights, and other progressive values anathema to Trump’s personal and political positions, and I was loath to imagine another four years of his regime. However, I also stake an intense personal interest in the Hong Kong protests against Beijing’s encroachment. Trump’s widely perceived hawkishness over China has led many […]

February 1st, 2021|Articles, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Democracy at its best: majoritarian or parliamentary electoral systems?

Democracy at its best: majoritarian or parliamentary electoral systems?

Written by Ishan Kaushal

Image from: https://blogs.iadb.org/ideas-matter/en/covid-19-threats-and-opportunities-for-democracy/

Without doubt, these are taxing circumstances for political leaders and the ruling class. Leaders have been craving certainty where little exists. Risk management focusses on the great skill of analysing and assessing those outcomes that are uncertain, and identifying others that are slightly less uncertain. The importance of crisis management is even more salient today […]

January 18th, 2021|Articles|0 Comments|
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    ESSAY COMPETITION 1ST PLACE: What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

ESSAY COMPETITION 1ST PLACE: What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

Written by Jasper Shuhan Lan

1.0 Introduction 

As we look ahead towards future global threats, it is critical for governments to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic. In my opinion, the greatest lesson for governments may be to appreciate the rise of the second modernity and reflect its implications in policy-making. 

1.1 The Second Modernity 

First conceptualised by late german sociologist Prof. Ulrich Beck, […]

December 22nd, 2020|Articles|0 Comments|
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    ESSAY COMPETITION 2ND PLACE: What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

ESSAY COMPETITION 2ND PLACE: What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

Written by Melvin Loh Zhi Yuan (2nd place)

Political Leaders Must Stop The Blame Game and Start Working Together to Fight COVID-19 

Golding’s Lord of the Flies tells a story of the quest for survival and rescue by some schoolboys while stranded on an island. However, it was soon before the poor leadership under Ralph led to complete mayhem. The story reflects […]

December 14th, 2020|Articles|0 Comments|
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    ESSAY COMPETITION 3RD PLACE: What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

ESSAY COMPETITION 3RD PLACE: What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

Written by Rory Cooper (3rd place)

What is the most important lesson for political leaders to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic?

Originating in the Wuhan province in China, COVID-19 has taken a heavy toll on nations around the world, resulting in millions of people under lock down. This has had extremely negative impacts upon multiple aspects of our society, economy and […]

December 7th, 2020|Articles|0 Comments|
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    Analysing USCIRF 2020: An assault of secularism on religion?

Analysing USCIRF 2020: An assault of secularism on religion?

Written by Ritik Kanoujia and Abhinav Singh (National Law University, Jodhpur)

On 29th April, the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) released its Annual Report 2020. The commission’s principal responsibilities include reviewing violations of religious freedom internationally and making policy recommendations in a bid to protect and preserve the inalienable right to religious freedom. The commission functions in furtherance […]

December 2nd, 2020|Articles|0 Comments|

From dynasty to decay: an analysis of 19th century changes to the Chinese political economy

Written by Caroline Wohl (General Course)

Despite economic prowess during the Song dynasty, subsequent regimes failed to
replicate growth (Brandt, Ma and Rawski, 2014). Using Francis Fukuyama’s Reactionary Thermador Model, I will argue that interlocking incentives among the Qing’s bureaucratic elite provided resistance to reform in the nineteenth and twentieth-century. This lack of reform deteriorated the state’s legitimacy, creating preconditions for […]

March 28th, 2019|Articles|0 Comments|

Are Populism and Democracy Incompatible?

Written by George Pipiou (PPE)

The one-line argument employed to discredit populism is a reiteration of the mantra that ‘populism is incompatible with democracy’. In this article I aim to prove that this is actually far from the truth. A simple etymological decomposition of the word democracy into its two Greek components dêmos and kratía sheds light on this. For […]

March 5th, 2019|Articles|0 Comments|