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Daniel Rosenthal

December 19th, 2019

LSE Top 5: Best Places to Study

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Daniel Rosenthal

December 19th, 2019

LSE Top 5: Best Places to Study

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Postgraduate student, Dan Rosenthal, in the MSc Human Resources and Organisations programme studying Organisational Behaviour will be writing his very own ‘LSE Top 5’ series. Let’s start with something every LSE student needs to do when they first arrive…find the best places to study. Only when you have mastered that essential task can you turn to bigger and better things.

Hello all!

I’m Dan and I’m excited to be writing what may be the first of many (2…3…maybe more?) posts about my top 5 favourite places on LSE’s campus.

Before we begin, I want to call out a few disclaimers about my list:

  • I’m a writer (aka Human Resources student) and not a photographer…therefore, I cannot vouch for the quality of my pictures. However, the iPhone XS has pretty a good camera, so maybe you will be impressed.
  • I’m limiting my list to 5 potential study spots on campus – this is purely based on personal preference and ease of access. Do explore beyond this list as there are so many different spaces at LSE, conducive to a good learning environment, that I’m sure I’ve missed.
  • While there are numerous private and group study areas on LSE’s campus, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that there are also numerous cafés in the surrounding area – take advantage!

 

Without further ado and in no particular order…

 

3rd Floor Centre Building

The Centre Building at LSE is brand new and was completed in time for this academic year. To be honest, I’m not sure what students did before this building existed but am so glad that it’s here.

It not only provides some of the best study spots on campus, but is also home to lecture halls, smaller classrooms, social areas, a café, and outside terraces.

While the 1st and 2nd floors have numerous study spots, head up to the higher levels to find quieter, more private areas on the academic department floors. You’ll also have a better chance at grabbing a spot, since the lower levels can be quite packed with students throughout the day.

 

3rd Floor Center Building

 

4th Floor Main Library – Collaborative Space

The British Library of Political and Economic Science at LSE is impressive and features a staircase that spirals up through its centre. The library houses numerous private and group study spaces, as well as LSE Life (honorable mention for this list).

Of particular note is the group collaborative space on the 4th floor. In addition to housing communal tables for teamwork, it has comfortable red “pods” (I don’t think that’s the technical term) that are slightly more private and feature monitors/screens for working on presentations.

4th Floor Main Library – Collaborative Space

 

6th Floor Old Building – Shaw Library

Nestled away on the 6th floor of LSE’s Old Building, the Shaw Library not only acts as a quiet study space, but also offers room for musical performances and rehearsals throughout the year.

It’s very picturesque (photo doesn’t do it justice) and has a more traditional library vibe to it.

It is usually very quiet and offers a safe refuge to get some reading done. It can fill up quickly depending on the time you go, so scope it out and claim your spot! Doesn’t it just make you want to study?

LSE 6th Floor Old Building – Shaw Library
6th Floor Old Building – Shaw Library

 

Staircase Landings – New Academic Building

The New Academic Building (NAB for short) houses academic departments (such as the Department of Management) as well as numerous classrooms, lecture halls, open collaborative spaces and cafes including a Vegan one.

As you climb the stairs to each of the lower floors, you’ll find public spaces on each landing. These make for a place to relax between classes or study.

It can sometimes be a bit loud due to the open design of the building but it’s a great place to work on group projects or prep with classmates before a seminar.

LSE Staircase Landings – New Academic Building
Staircase Landings – New Academic Building

 

The LSE Garrick Café

Ok – so this one might not be a traditional study space, but I highly recommend giving it a try.

As you can see from the list above, I tend to prefer slightly more social study situations as opposed to complete silence. The Garrick is no exception, as it can be loud around lunch time and mid-afternoon. That being said, it’s a delight and a good place to grab a coffee or tea before getting to work on some reading.

Put in your headphones and you are all set.

Some areas (pictured below) can be more private, but there are numerous tables throughout the café. As the café is at the edge of campus (and the opposite end from the library), you feel a little bit of separation from your academics. Don’t forget to people watch if you grab a window seat.

The LSE Garrick Café

 

That’s it for now! I hope you enjoyed some of my favourite study spots on campus. More to come. 

About the author

Daniel Rosenthal

Daniel Rosenthal

Organisational Behaviour - MSc Human Resources and Organisations 2019-20

Posted In: Student life | The Student Lens

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