Workshop Proceedings

Tracing the Rise of Sectarianism in Iraq after 2003

by Toby Dodge
This memo was presented at a workshop organised by the LSE Middle East Centre on 29 June 2018 looking at the comparative politics of sub-state identity in the Middle East.

Principle Visions in Iraq

Deploying a ‘Bourdieusian’ approach to explaining the rise of sectarianism within Iraq’s political field after 2003 involves identifying and explaining the rise to dominance of sub-state communalist […]

September 13th, 2018|Iraq, Workshop Proceedings|1 Comment|
  • Permalink Supporters of Muqtada Sadr celebrate after Fatah's win during the 2018 elections, Baghdad. © Zoheir Seidanloo, Fars News.Gallery

    Pierre Bourdieu and Explanations of Sectarian Mobilisation in Iraq and the Wider Middle East

Pierre Bourdieu and Explanations of Sectarian Mobilisation in Iraq and the Wider Middle East

by Toby Dodge
This memo was presented at a workshop organised by the LSE Middle East Centre on 29 June 2018 looking at the comparative politics of sub-state identity in the Middle East.

If the study of sectarian mobilisation is both driven and constrained by the polarisation of rationalist individualism and collective structuralism, then applying insights from Pierre Bourdieu’s work may well help […]

  • Martyr's Square protest
    Permalink Sign protesting sectarian divide, reading 'United towards a bright future', Martyrs' Square, Beirut, Lebanon. © Petteri Sulonen, 2005.Gallery

    Seeking to Explain Sectarian Mobilisation in the Middle East

Seeking to Explain Sectarian Mobilisation in the Middle East

by Toby Dodge
This memo was presented at a workshop organised by the LSE Middle East Centre on 29 June 2018 looking at the comparative politics of sub-state identity in the Middle East.

It is always a good idea to start any discussion of sectarianism with a clear working definition. Sectarianism is the reification of religious distinctions, in this case between Sunni and […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Comparative Politics of Sub-state Identity in the Middle East

The Comparative Politics of Sub-state Identity in the Middle East

Since the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the ‘Arab Spring’ of 2011 and Syria’s descent into civil war, there has been an upsurge in the number of publications that have sought to explain the spread of political mobilisation, justified through sectarian rhetoric, across the contemporary Middle East. A great deal of this work is highly descriptive in its approach. […]

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