Internet regulation

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    What the U.K.’s Online Harms white paper teaches us about internet regulation

What the U.K.’s Online Harms white paper teaches us about internet regulation

A new Online Harms White Paper, published jointly by the UK government’s Department for Digital, Media, Culture and Sport and the Home Office, calls for a new system of regulation for tech companies with the goal of preventing online harms, including disinformation, cyberbullying, extremist content, and advocacy of self-harm. Here, Canadian academics Blayne Haggart, Brock University and Natasha Tusikov, York […]

  • Permalink Credit: Mike Lee https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeleeorg/ used under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/Gallery

    Regulating against online harms: corporate accountability’s new wave?

Regulating against online harms: corporate accountability’s new wave?

The UK Government’s Online Harms White Paper promises a new culture of transparency, trust and accountability. Writing with Thorsten Brønholt, LSE Visiting Fellow Jonny Shipp highlights developments in UK Government thinking and invites Internet firms to collaborate on the Internet Commission’s independent evaluation framework, which looks at how they are tackling illegal content, hate speech, cyberbullying, self-harm and fake […]

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    What do we talk about when we talk about internet regulation?

What do we talk about when we talk about internet regulation?

A White Paper on Online Harms is due to be launched by the UK government on Monday, and was leaked to the Guardian yesterday. It will outline the government’s broad plans for social media regulation with the aim of preventing a range of online harms. Here, Impress CEO Jonathan Heawood outlines the many proposals on the table and considers […]

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    The playing field between YouTube and television will be a bit fairer, but still far from level

The playing field between YouTube and television will be a bit fairer, but still far from level

Last week, the European Parliament adopted the revised text of the the Audiovisual Media Services Directive, which governs EU-wide coordination of national legislation on all audiovisual media. The revised directive, which aims to better to reflect the digital age, is expected to come into force by the end of the year and once adopted, member States will have 21 […]

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    Anticipatory regulation: a way forward for platform governance?

Anticipatory regulation: a way forward for platform governance?

Tackling the crisis in public information and the role of information technology companies such as Facebook and Google is a much-debated topic in the UK, and a focus of our LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology which will launch its report in November. The Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has published its interim report from its inquiry into fake news, and […]

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    Regulating online platforms for misinformation and disinformation

Regulating online platforms for misinformation and disinformation

How to deal with misinformation is a topic of significant debate in the UK, and a focus of our LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology, which will launch its report in November. The Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has released its interim report from its inquiry into fake news, and is likely to publish its final report […]

  • Permalink Credit: Mike Lee https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeleeorg/ used under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/Gallery

    The essential elements of the new Internet governance: diversity, optimism and independence

The essential elements of the new Internet governance: diversity, optimism and independence

In May 2018, UK Government set out its plan to publish a Code of Conduct and develop proposals to legislate on Internet safety. In July 2018 the Internet Commission’s Dialogue on Digital Responsibility convened leading thinkers and civil society advocates to debate related proposals from others about transparency reporting, an accountability framework and the idea of a duty of […]

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    House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”

House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”

Oscar Davies is a media lawyer who will start pupillage at One Brick Court in October 2019. In this blog, he provides the second part of his overview of the evidence submitted for the House of Lords Communications Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?” (Part 1 can be found here). Responses to questions 4 to 6 of the Call […]

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    House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”. An overview of the evidence, Part 1

House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”. An overview of the evidence, Part 1

Oscar Davies is a media lawyer who will start pupillage at One Brick Court in October 2019. In this blog, he provides a summary of some of the evidence that has been submitted to the House of Lords Communications Committee as part of its inquiry into online regulation. This post was first published on Inforrm, and is reproduced here […]

  • Permalink Credit: Mike Lee https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeleeorg/ used under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/Gallery

    If digital intermediaries are to be regulated, how should it be done?

If digital intermediaries are to be regulated, how should it be done?

Jacob Rowbottom is a Fellow of University College, Oxford and is the author of Media Law (2018). Following the recent call by The Times for a new statutory online regulator, he outlines the case for a possible system of meta-regulation and explains how this might work in the case of digital intermediaries.

The regulation of digital intermediaries has been an […]