Brexit

Why the EU Settlement Scheme is not good enough as it is

Now the UK has formally left the European Union, and entered the transition period, Alexandra Bulat assesses the flaws in the EU citizens’ Settlement Scheme and argues that it still undermines the fundamental rights of those affected.

In the summer of 2019, I wrote to explain why the rights of EU citizens were not a done deal. The Withdrawal Agreement […]

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    Britain in one room: reflections on a focus group of undecided voters during GE2019

Britain in one room: reflections on a focus group of undecided voters during GE2019

During the 2019 election campaign, the University of Manchester hosted a series of focus groups of then undecided voters, organised with The Times and Public First. Timothy J. Oliver and Andy Westwood reflect on the experience of helping to run this event.

Understanding how voters are behaving is an ongoing struggle for many in our field – to which we […]

Brexit: epitaph for a national trajectory now lost

Many developments in national histories also mark watersheds in the personal lives of their citizens, and for the economist John Van Reenen the advent of ‘Brexit Day’ is a case in point. In a personal essay he reflects both on the emotional colouring of this event, and on the economic costs implied for the United Kingdom.

As I write on […]

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    The end of foreign policy consensus? How Remainers and Leavers view Britain’s place in the world

The end of foreign policy consensus? How Remainers and Leavers view Britain’s place in the world

Drawing on data from the LSE’s collection of materials from the 2016 referendum campaign, Benjamin Martill finds that the Remain and Leave camps articulated distinct views when it came to foreign affairs. The findings also suggest that the goals of British foreign policy itself are likely to be increasingly subject of political division after Brexit.

The Brexit vote, we are told […]

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    Preparing British foreign policy for the post-Brexit era: why swift and sudden institutional change is not the answer

Preparing British foreign policy for the post-Brexit era: why swift and sudden institutional change is not the answer

A policy vision backed up by energetic leadership and greater investment will do more to strengthen the institutions of UK foreign policy than hastily introduced institutional changes, explains Nicholas Wright.

Having successfully navigated the general election and with Britain’s formal withdrawal from the EU just a matter of days away, Boris Johnson is believed to be considering major structural changes […]

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    Sixteen reasons to expect just another, ‘standard-issue’ Tory government

Sixteen reasons to expect just another, ‘standard-issue’ Tory government

A torrent of ‘expert’ commentary has evaluated positively the chances of a Boris Johnson government adopting new, ‘one nation’ policies to give priority to the interests of working class voters and ‘left behind’ communities in northern or midland Britain. Patrick Dunleavy enumerates the numerous countervailing reasons to expect instead that this government will be very similar to its Conservative […]

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    ‘The most important election in a generation’ – just like the last election (and the next?)

‘The most important election in a generation’ – just like the last election (and the next?)

Despite the 2019 general election being portrayed as the most important in a generation, Christopher Kirkland writes that it is too simplistic to suggest that some elections are more important than others.

The Conservatives’ message in the 2019 election is that it wants to ‘get Brexit done’. More than three years after the EU referendum, which was consistently defined as […]

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    Democratic rights Vs. expected outcomes: why do citizens support referendums?

Democratic rights Vs. expected outcomes: why do citizens support referendums?

Whether or not to hold a referendum on Brexit is a clear dividing line between parties in the upcoming UK general election. However, Philipp Harms and Claudia Landwehr argue that support for such a measure is often largely contingent on expected outcomes, and so can entrench political divides. More deliberative democratic innovations might therefore be better suited to resolving […]