Media and Politics

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    Book Review: Pressed for time: The acceleration of life in digital capitalism

Book Review: Pressed for time: The acceleration of life in digital capitalism

In Pressed for Time, Judy Wajcman explains why we immediately interpret our experiences with digital technology as inexorably accelerating everyday life. She argues that we are not mere hostages to communication devices, and the sense of always being rushed is the result of the priorities and parameters we ourselves set rather than the machines that help us set them. Casey Brienza […]

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    Book Review: Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia, Participation, Ethics by Jenny Kidd

Book Review: Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia, Participation, Ethics by Jenny Kidd

This is an important contribution to debates around museums today, and a book that consistently asks intelligent and challenging questions of museum critics, practitioners and audiences, writes Richard Martin.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review of Books.

Museums in the New Mediascape: Transmedia, Participation, Ethics. Jenny Kidd. Ashgate. 2014.

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What do we want from museums today? How do […]

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    Book Review: Sharing Our Lives Online: Risks and Exposure in Social Media by David R. Brake

Book Review: Sharing Our Lives Online: Risks and Exposure in Social Media by David R. Brake

The growth of social media sees us heading towards a radically open society. David R. Brake aims to provide an overview of the harms that can be posed by unwary social media use for both adults and children. He then draws on in-depth interviews, and a range of related theories of human behaviour to consider why this happens. This […]

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    Book Review: Violence and Understanding in Gaza: The British Broadsheets’ Coverage of the War by Dávid Kaposi

Book Review: Violence and Understanding in Gaza: The British Broadsheets’ Coverage of the War by Dávid Kaposi

Instead of asking who is innocent and who should be blamed, the media should start to treat the Israel-Palestine conflict as a story of mutually painful but very real human relations, argues Dávid Kaposi in his new book. Catherine Hezser hopes that journalists will take up Kaposi’s suggestions and initiate a more complex, balanced, and historically-informed discourse on Israel and Hamas/Palestinians.

This review was […]

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    Book Review: Journalism: A Very Short Introduction by Ian Hargreaves

Book Review: Journalism: A Very Short Introduction by Ian Hargreaves

In a world where many consumers are unhappy to pay for news and entertainment content, what is the future of journalism? In this Very Short Introduction, Ian Hargreaves looks not only at what journalism has been in the past, but also at what it is becoming in the digital age, and examines the big issues relating to reportage, warfare, celebrity culture, privacy, […]

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    Book Review: The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett

Book Review: The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld by Jamie Bartlett

The Dark Net aims to examine the most innovative and dangerous online subcultures: trolls and pornographers, drug dealers and hackers, political extremists and computer scientists, Bitcoin programmers and self-harmers, libertarians and vigilantes. Ian Hargreaves finds that some of Jamie Bartlett’s arguments seem out of tune with the times, though the book remains an illuminating read.

This review was originally published on the LSE Review […]

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    Book Review: Game After: A Cultural Study of Video Game Afterlife by Raiford Guins

Book Review: Game After: A Cultural Study of Video Game Afterlife by Raiford Guins

In Game After, Raiford Guins looks closely at video games as museum objects, engaging with curatorial and archival practices across a range of cultural institutions. Chapters cover museums dedicated to the medium, the vast landfills that housed unwanted video games, and the popularity of vintage game superstores. Alison Gazzard finds that the author’s multi-disciplinary approach to studying the after life of games makes […]

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    Book Review: Are We All Scientific Experts Now? by Harry Collins

Book Review: Are We All Scientific Experts Now? by Harry Collins

A series of recent scientific scandals, frauds, and failures have led some to question science’s pre–eminence. Revelations such as Climategate or debates about the safety of the MMR vaccine have dented public confidence in science. Are We All Scientific Experts Now? is a valuable contribution to the ways in which we ascribe value to expertise, writes William Allen. Although Collins convincingly […]