BrexitVote

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    Why applying for citizenship is an anxiety filled process – and not just for applicants

Why applying for citizenship is an anxiety filled process – and not just for applicants

As we consider what post-Brexit citizenship might look like, it is crucial to understand the pervasiveness of anxiety and its integral role in shaping policy processes. Here, Anne-Marie Fortier discusses how anxiety is attached especially to English language ability for applicants, whilst also highlighting the role it plays for those on the other side of the process: the registrars checking applications  for citizenship or settlement.

Writing for The Guardian, […]

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    The EU referendum and some paradoxes of democratic legitimacy

The EU referendum and some paradoxes of democratic legitimacy

Referendums are potentially destabilising in parliamentary democracies because they generate alternative, competing sources of legitimacy, writes Nat le Roux. A majority of elected representatives may hold one view on a matter of national importance, and if a referendum demonstrates that a majority of the public hold the opposite view, which manifestation of democratic legitimacy should trump the other? 

In Britain, […]

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    Integration after Brexit: immigration policy is important, but so too is what happens to migrants after they arrive

Integration after Brexit: immigration policy is important, but so too is what happens to migrants after they arrive

Immigration was centre-stage in the referendum campaign and the Leave vote raises many questions about the future direction of immigration policy. Will the UK retain free movement as a condition of keeping access to the free market? Or will potential EU migrants face the same rules as non-EU nationals in a post-Brexit Britain? Jill Rutter discusses how these issues […]

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    Why there should be a general election before Article 50 is triggered

Why there should be a general election before Article 50 is triggered

The Conservative Party is currently selecting a new leader who is expected to trigger Article 50 and begin the process of the UK leaving the European Union. Kenneth Armstrong writes that as the UK will need to set out what sort of new relationship it wants with the EU, there is a clear case for an early general election […]

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    UKIP on the up? The future looks set to play into their hands, it’s just a matter of grabbing it

UKIP on the up? The future looks set to play into their hands, it’s just a matter of grabbing it

Despite the sudden – though hardly unprecedented – resignation of their long-serving leader, it is hard to deny that UKIP  is having a productive year. And it might be about to get even better, argues Ben Margulies. From Labour’s struggle with working class voters to the wrangling over Article 50, it’s all  ammunition for the populist party. Now the question is […]

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    Social identity not social cash – why areas that received money from the EU voted against it

Social identity not social cash – why areas that received money from the EU voted against it

One surprise from the referendum result was the way in which areas of high public spending showed no gratitude for the largesse. The traditional approach to social division, focused on income inequality, will not heal a divided nation, argues Tony Hockley. Social identity is at least as important to uniting the country as social cash. 

The contenders to succeed David Cameron have […]

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    Predicting the Brexit vote: getting the geography right (more or less)

Predicting the Brexit vote: getting the geography right (more or less)

In April 2016 in two contributions to this blog Ron Johnston, Kelvyn Jones and David Manley predicted the likely geography of support for Brexit in the EU referendum. In this concluding piece they compare their predictions to the result. The general pattern of their predictions turned out to be very accurate, but regional differences were more pronounced than anticipated, with variations in both […]

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    “Brexit chaos proves that I was right all along,” says everyone. Our political narratives need to change, or they’ll become barriers to thought

“Brexit chaos proves that I was right all along,” says everyone. Our political narratives need to change, or they’ll become barriers to thought

In times of uncertainty, politics is about choosing between competing narratives. The trouble is that narratives tend to be more about sticking to one’s position than responding to events. We need our politicians to be better at changing their stories and their minds, argues Kate Alexander Shaw.

In the week since the Brexit referendum there has been plenty of hand-wringing […]