BrexitVote

How the major parties will face the EU referendum

Kenneth Bunker looks at the state of the major parties as they head into the EU referendum campaign, and assesses what different results might mean for each of them. He argues that, overall, we can expect winning parties will try and spin their victories as heroic and losing parties will attempt to spin their losses as hope for the future. […]

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    The EU is only an episode in European history – and is doomed to failure

The EU is only an episode in European history – and is doomed to failure

The EU’s drive for social, political and economic unity threatens Europe’s historical traditions of diversity, writes Martyn Rady. He argues that whilst Europe shares much in terms of common history and culture, this is not in itself sufficient to underpin political union across the continent – or indeed to foster a shared European identity.

Europe is not the same as the European Union. […]

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    What happens after Brexit is up to us. Why not open our borders to non-EU workers?

What happens after Brexit is up to us. Why not open our borders to non-EU workers?

The Leave campaigns point out that quitting the EU would give the UK control over its border and immigration policy. They are right, says Chris Bickerton. It would be an opportunity to open Britain’s borders to anyone who wished to work here – not just European citizens. Brexit would be an opportunity for the UK to decide whether it wants to be […]

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    The grievances of the fishing industry would be better aimed at the UK government, not the EU

The grievances of the fishing industry would be better aimed at the UK government, not the EU

Fishing is a proud industry and its struggle has been propelled to prominence in the debate on the EU referendum next month. Griffin Carpenter argues that, despite what Brexit: The Movie claims, the genuine grievances of the fishing industry should be directed at the UK government, not the EU.

It is indisputable that many ports and coastal communities around the UK […]

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    After a Leave vote the UK would have a strong hand in any trade negotiations

After a Leave vote the UK would have a strong hand in any trade negotiations

The UK runs significant trade deficits with politically important EU countries. Ruth Lea shows that it is hence an  important market for the EU’s key exporters and rather than being a supplicant, the UK would, after a vote to leave the union, have a very strong hand of cards to play.

It is sometimes claimed that UK markets matter comparatively little […]

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    Turn out or else: do referendum campaigns actually change voters’ minds?

Turn out or else: do referendum campaigns actually change voters’ minds?

Over £9m has been spent on leaflets for all British household outlining the arguments in favour of remaining in the EU. But do campaign activities actually sway voters in referendums? Would campaigners do best to try to change minds, or simply motivate their supporters to turn out at the polls? Which arguments will prove decisive? Sara Hobolt and Sara Hagemann report […]

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    A Brexit could make it easier for Scotland to join the EU as an independent state

A Brexit could make it easier for Scotland to join the EU as an independent state

One of the key issues in the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence was the question of how an independent Scotland could join the EU and whether it would retain the same membership terms as the UK. Merijn Chamon and Guillaume Van der Loo revisit the issue in light of the UK’s upcoming referendum on EU membership. They argue that if […]

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    Brexit would harm the EU’s global credibility – and could rip apart the Conservatives too

Brexit would harm the EU’s global credibility – and could rip apart the Conservatives too

A British exit would have a devastating impact on the European Union and relegate it to a second-rank world power in the eyes of the global community. John Ryan argues that the Union would see its diplomatic power greatly diminished, and that domestically a Brexit would also further divide the Conservative party.

The geopolitical impact of a Brexit had become a “forgotten dimension” of the EU debate. […]