British and Irish Politics and Policy

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    How to get an OBE: the opaque process by which Britain chooses its honorees

How to get an OBE: the opaque process by which Britain chooses its honorees

In the 20th century, the British Crown appointed around 100,000 people to honours and titles. Throughout the century, this system expanded to include different kinds of people. Toby Harper writes that the process nevertheless continues to be confusing and tells us little about who honorees really are.

Suppose you meet a man on the train who introduces himself as ‘Sir […]

What we can learn from the controversy around Huawei

Despite US pressure to block Huawei, the UK government has decided to let the firm continue to be used in its 5G networks with certain restrictions. Jonathan Liebenau addresses Huawei’s historical context as a company, and moves on to consider some motives that have brought it under scrutiny.

In recent weeks I have frequently been asked about what we should […]

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    Despite electoral defeat, Labour’s proposals on corporate governance should not be ignored

Despite electoral defeat, Labour’s proposals on corporate governance should not be ignored

Adonis Pegasiou explains why corporate governance reform must not cease to be part of the public debate, and why the proposals that Labour put forward during the 2019 election campaign should not be overlooked.

The 2019 election will be remembered in the annals of the UK’s political history for how Brexit managed to reshape the party-political landscape. The Conservative Party […]

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    Labour in the post-Corbyn era: lessons from the 1985-86 inquiry into Militant

Labour in the post-Corbyn era: lessons from the 1985-86 inquiry into Militant

Christopher Massey writes that the expulsion of Militant members in the 1980s broke not only their hold on Liverpool City Council, but resulted in the realignment of Labour’s left into ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ factions. He argues that today’s party must similarly decide whether the weight of recent polling and past history require a fundamental break with groups associated with […]

Brexit: epitaph for a national trajectory now lost

Many developments in national histories also mark watersheds in the personal lives of their citizens, and for the economist John Van Reenen the advent of ‘Brexit Day’ is a case in point. In a personal essay he reflects both on the emotional colouring of this event, and on the economic costs implied for the United Kingdom.

As I write on […]

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    The end of foreign policy consensus? How Remainers and Leavers view Britain’s place in the world

The end of foreign policy consensus? How Remainers and Leavers view Britain’s place in the world

Drawing on data from the LSE’s collection of materials from the 2016 referendum campaign, Benjamin Martill finds that the Remain and Leave camps articulated distinct views when it came to foreign affairs. The findings also suggest that the goals of British foreign policy itself are likely to be increasingly subject of political division after Brexit.

The Brexit vote, we are told […]

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    Voters dislike disproportionality in electoral systems – even when it benefits the party they support

Voters dislike disproportionality in electoral systems – even when it benefits the party they support

Taking advantage of a uniquely designed survey experiment, Carolina Plescia, André Blais, and John Högström investigate the effect of proportionality on voter support for voting rules in four countries, namely Austria, the UK, Ireland and Sweden. They find that voters for both small and large parties dislike disproportionality in electoral systems, with little cross-country variation.

In 2015, the UK Independence […]

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    Towards a political economy of charging regimes: fines and fees in UK immigration control

Towards a political economy of charging regimes: fines and fees in UK immigration control

The extraction of revenue is an integral component of UK immigration control. Drawing on new data, Jon Burnett and Fidelis Chebe examine the functions of charging regimes as a distinct form of statecraft that contributes to the political economy of financial power, with significant implications for understandings of criminalisation and immigration enforcement.

In December 2019, the High Court ruled that […]