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    Another ‘rotten borough’? Allegations of electoral fraud in Peterborough

Another ‘rotten borough’? Allegations of electoral fraud in Peterborough

Timothy Peace and Parveen Akhtar discuss the allegations of electoral malpractice in the recent Peterborough by-election in which Labour won by 683 votes. While an initial police inquiry found that no offences were revealed, they explain why certain areas are more susceptible to such claims than others.

After its success in the European Parliament elections, many expected Nigel Farage’s Brexit […]

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    The link between the framing of election results and expectations about government performance

The link between the framing of election results and expectations about government performance

Based on a survey experiment, Ekaterina Kolpinskaya, Gabriel Katz, Susan Banducci, Daniel Stevens, and Travis Coan find that victories depicted as narrow in the media increased scepticism about the incoming government’s ability to deliver on its promises. The opposite was observed when the victory was presented as decisive – especially among the less politically knowledgeable.

Although it may be heart-warming […]

Book Review: Global Burnout

In Global Burnout, Pascal Chabot examines the phenomenon of burnout, locating it as a direct result of the spirit of our age and its overriding values. While Chabot’s work seeks more to untangle the threads of the problem than offer a solution, this is a superb work of philosophical narrative, writes Roderick Howlett, in search of a way to re-enchant our […]

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    Previous work experience is not a good predictor of how people will perform in a new job

Previous work experience is not a good predictor of how people will perform in a new job

Chad Van Iddekinge, John Arnold, Rachel Frieder, and Philip Roth find that the criteria organizations currently use to screen job applicants generally are poor predictors of future performance. This is because previous employment says nothing about how well applicants performed there nor does past experience in one organisation translate into effective performance in another.

The use of job experience in […]

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    Prisoner voting rights: the conflict between the government and the courts was really about executive power

Prisoner voting rights: the conflict between the government and the courts was really about executive power

In UK political disputes over European Court of Human Rights judgments, such as the high-profile objections to rulings on prisoner voting, much political capital is made out of the claim that the European Court is impinging on parliamentary sovereignty. However, Helen Hardman argues that the objections have instead been based on concern that court rulings would limit the decision-making […]

June 20th, 2019|Featured|0 Comments|
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    British democracy and the power of the military: too much or too little?

British democracy and the power of the military: too much or too little?

Since the invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the escalation of Britain’s involvement in Afghanistan in 2006, the British military have gone from being highly popular to spectacularly popular. This has been achieved in spite of the widespread perception that the two wars were failures. Why, then, has the military become so popular and does this represent a threat […]

The Brexit Prime Minister? Assessing Theresa May’s legacy

Theresay May’s real legacy is that her premiership exacerbated the political divides behind the ongoing breakdown of the Conservative-Labour duopoly of the party system, write Christopher Byrne, Nick Randall, and Kevin Theakston.
The political obituaries that followed Theresa May’s decision to step down as Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative party were not kind. The Times’ assessment was that […]

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    Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them

Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them

In Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe in Them, Joseph Uscinski presents a collection that brings together contributors to offer an wide-ranging take on conspiracy theories, examining them as historical phenomena, psychological quirks, expressions of power relations and political instruments. While this is an interesting and expansive volume, writes Max Budra, it overlooks the conundrum posed by conspiracy theories that […]