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  • Permalink The Westminster Bridge links Lambeth on the south of the Thames to Westminster and the Palace of Westminster on the north. In the foreground you can see one of the gothic shields that adorns the bridge.Gallery

    Whatever happened to the Westminster Model? The ‘Italianisation’ of British politics

Whatever happened to the Westminster Model? The ‘Italianisation’ of British politics

The UK was once viewed by political scientists as embodying a distinct majoritarian form of politics – the ‘Westminster Model’ – that stood in contrast to the ‘consensus’ democracies found elsewhere in Europe. Several of the countries in the latter group, such as Italy, were often assumed to be inherently prone to instability in comparison to the UK. Yet […]

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    The different ‘types’ of poverty: is there a problem with how we currently talk about poverty?

The different ‘types’ of poverty: is there a problem with how we currently talk about poverty?

Stephen Crossley, Kayleigh Garthwaite, and Ruth Patrick argue that the different ‘types’ of poverty that have emerged in recent years may have the effect of diverting attention away from structural and systemic issues that need to be addressed. They introduce a new project which aims to encourage more critical discussion about the implications of this increased fragmentation of poverty.

In […]

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    The data behind mortality trends: explaining the recent improvement in mortality in England

The data behind mortality trends: explaining the recent improvement in mortality in England

One of the most important functions of a government is to ensure the health of its population, with the main indicator being measures of mortality such as life expectancy. Mike Murphy writes that, contrary to popular belief, current levels of mortality are the lowest ever recorded by a substantial margin.

Recent reports of adverse mortality trends in Britain have […]

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    Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Artemis Photiadou and Alice Park draw on various strands of research to argue that unless a Conservative manifesto is more radical and relevant than this Queen’s Speech, then a future Johnson government will fail to address fundamental issues, many of which have been caused by other Conservative policies.

Though the likelihood remains the Queen’s Speech will be voted down in […]

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    How have Parliament’s rules changed since 1811? Introducing the UK ParlRules dataset

How have Parliament’s rules changed since 1811? Introducing the UK ParlRules dataset

Niels Goet, Thomas Fleming, and Radoslaw Zubek introduce a machine‐readable dataset of House of Commons Standing Orders between 1811 and 2015. They demonstrate how this can be used to measure procedural change, and thus substantially advance our understanding of legislative reforms.
Parliamentary rules have important consequences: they affect what kind of legislation gets passed and at what speed, who gets to […]

Long Read: Book Review | A Treatise on Northern Ireland

John A. Hall reviews Brendan O’Leary’s Treatise on Northern Ireland, which covers both analytic questions of the historical record and the political calculations and details of constitutional arrangements. He concludes that the three volumes will be with us for years.

A Treatise on Northern Ireland, Volume One: Colonialism. The Shackles of the State and Hereditary Animosities, £75, xxxv + 522 […]

October 13th, 2019|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    The Bedroom Tax in Northern Ireland: playing a dangerous game with peace?

The Bedroom Tax in Northern Ireland: playing a dangerous game with peace?

Northern Ireland is about to experience many of the austerity policies that have been rolled out in England, including the Bedroom Tax. Although this had been implemented in 2017, a ‘mitigation package’ ensured households were protected from it until 2020. With that deadline now nearing, and with no government in place, the policy is set to have many negative […]

An asset to Boris Johnson: ideology in Brexit Britain

Despite all the comings and goings at Westminster, and the debatable qualities of the latest Brexit proposal, the underlying ideological dispositions of a large proportion of the electorate favour Boris Johnson and the Conservatives, write Joe Greenwood and Joe Twyman.

In the aftermath of the success of the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum on the UK’s membership of the […]