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    Religious diversity in the workplace: the case for alternative dispute resolution

Religious diversity in the workplace: the case for alternative dispute resolution

Élise Rouméas uses a recent court case involving an NHS nurse being dismissed for proselytising religious views to explain why the matter could have been handled differently. Specifically, she argues that cases such as this illustrate how alternative dispute resolution ought to be seen as a desirable complement to the rule of law rather than a cheaper alternative.

In 2016, […]

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    Residential mobility in the UK: how distance and local economic conditions drive residential choices

Residential mobility in the UK: how distance and local economic conditions drive residential choices

Monica Langella and Alan Manning find that high unemployment in an area induces people to move away, and has an even stronger effect on the attractiveness of that area to potential movers. They also find that younger and better-educated individuals are less sensitive to distance and tend to move further away than other groups.

Regional inequalities are strongly persistent […]

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    If we want a better civil society we need to get policy thinkers to focus more on it

If we want a better civil society we need to get policy thinkers to focus more on it

A healthy charity sector is a crucial part of a good society, writes Dan Corry. He draws on the Charity Tax Commission’s latest report to explain why the sector deserves more study by academics, researchers, and policymakers.

Civil society is a very important part of what makes a good society and underpins a strong economy. Yet I am constantly amazed […]

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    A national unity government led by backbenchers to block no-deal Brexit is a dangerous idea

A national unity government led by backbenchers to block no-deal Brexit is a dangerous idea

The idea of a government of national unity to prevent a no-deal Brexit is a destructive contradiction and would only serve to sharpen divisions, writes Lea Ypi.
The metaphor of the body politic can be an attractive one to think about political community, especially when the body is on the verge of collapse and you have a name for the […]

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    Brexit and parliamentary legitimation: beyond constitutional minutiae

Brexit and parliamentary legitimation: beyond constitutional minutiae

David Judge writes that, while much of the discussion around Brexit and Parliament is about procedure and conventions, it should also be about the bigger picture: what does Brexit tell us about the fundamental principles of the UK’s parliamentary state and representative democracy?

Politicians and the punditocracy have become consumed with the minutiae of parliamentary procedure and constitutional conventions – […]

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    Governing as a permanent form of campaigning: why the civil service is in mortal danger

Governing as a permanent form of campaigning: why the civil service is in mortal danger

Patrick Diamond writes that the process of governing is being transformed into a highly politicised form of campaigning, with polling and short-term politics being more important to Ministers than long-term policy. This puts the capacity of the state to steer a sensible course through the perilous post-Brexit landscape in serious doubt.     

Dominic Cummings’ arrival as chief strategist in Downing […]

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    Only a new unity government can effectively avert a no-deal Brexit

Only a new unity government can effectively avert a no-deal Brexit

If the UK is not to crash out of the European Union with no deal, Jonathan Boston argues that the current one-party political control of the executive will need to be temporarily suspended.

There is a clear majority view of the House of Commons that any withdrawal from the EU must be an agreed and orderly one, with clear succession […]

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    The Rising of the North of 1569 and the enduring geographical fault lines in English life

The Rising of the North of 1569 and the enduring geographical fault lines in English life

The story of the Northern Rising of 1569, writes John Tomaney, points to enduring geographical fault lines in English life, albeit reworked in different historical contexts. But themes of an indifferent Court and a region let down by its leaders resonate today.

450 years ago, the north of England rose in rebellion against the Tudor state. Its leaders were Thomas […]