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    Book Review: The New Enclosure: The Appropriation of Public Land in Neoliberal Britain

Book Review: The New Enclosure: The Appropriation of Public Land in Neoliberal Britain

In The New Enclosure: The Appropriation of Public Land in Neoliberal Britain, Brett Christophers offers a forensic analysis of Britain’s biggest and most consequential privatisation: the privatisation of land. This is a crisp, nuanced text that contributes to our understanding of recent economic transformations and provides a distinctive account of neoliberalism. A must-read, writes John Tomaney. 
The New Enclosure: The Appropriation of […]

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    The UK needs a new electoral system, not a new political party

The UK needs a new electoral system, not a new political party

The new Independent Group of former Labour and Conservative MPs says it wishes to fix the UK’s broken politics. However, argues Jack Bridgewater, the first step in fixing politics at the centre is to reform the electoral system.

The resignation of 11 MPs from the two main parties (eight from Labour and three from the Conservatives to date, with more rumoured) […]

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    Three factors that affect public support for the implementation of EU referendum results

Three factors that affect public support for the implementation of EU referendum results

There is an ongoing debate in the UK over whether holding another referendum on EU membership would be democratic or not. Drawing on a new study, Sveinung Arnesen explains that while in general most citizens believe governments should follow the results of referendums on EU membership, this depends heavily upon the level of turnout, the size of the majority, […]

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    Emergency politics: why the government keeps emphasising 29 March as Brexit day

Emergency politics: why the government keeps emphasising 29 March as Brexit day

Ever since Theresa May triggered Article 50, 29 March keeps being portrayed as Brexit day. This continues to be the case, even though it is highly likely that an extension will be requested. Jonathan White explains why the focus on this deadline has a number of aims, not least to weaken resistance.

29 March 2019 has dominated British politics for […]

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    Top-down or bottom-up? Campaigns, social media, and the Scottish Independence Referendum

Top-down or bottom-up? Campaigns, social media, and the Scottish Independence Referendum

Using the 2014 referendum as a case study, Ana Ines Langer, Michael Comerford, and Des McNulty look at the extent to which the use of social media by campaigns follows the command and control model, or a more bottom-up, decentralized approach. They find that depending on a number of factors, some campaigns selectively adopt digital tools that fit with […]

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    How to determine the ‘will of the people’: a mathematical view

How to determine the ‘will of the people’: a mathematical view

Mathematician Bernhard von Stengel uses game theory to consider how a second Brexit referendum with more than two choices could be run, and how the counting-rule chosen for any multiple-choice ballot can determine the outcome.

If you favour a second referendum on Brexit (a prospect that is now, February 2019, receding), you should not only think of what you should ask the […]

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    Are non-custodial sentences a credible and cost-effective substitute to incarceration?

Are non-custodial sentences a credible and cost-effective substitute to incarceration?

Nick Cowen, Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay, and Juste Abramovaite analyse the effects of custodial and non-custodial sentences on recorded crime in England and Wales. Their results suggest that non-custodial sentences can be an effective alternative to custody when it comes to reducing property crime but their effect is less consistent when looking at violent crime.

As the criminal justice system struggles with […]

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    Economic voting and party positions: when and how wealth matters for the vote

Economic voting and party positions: when and how wealth matters for the vote

Does the ownership of economic assets matter for how people vote? Drawing on new research, Timothy Hellwig and Ian McAllister find the answer is yes. They argue that by changing their policy positions, parties can shape the influence of asset ownership on voter decisions.

The politics of asset ownership have received much attention in the aftermath of the Great Recession […]