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The impact of Brexit on the UK’s devolved energy system

Paul Cairney, Aileen McHarg, Nicola McEwen, Fiona Munro, and Karen Turner adopt an interdisciplinary approach in analysing the potential impact of Brexit on UK energy policy. They look at the legal separation of powers between different governments, the interaction between law and policy in practice, and the role of law as one of many contributors to policymaking.

Constitutional change could […]

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    Democracy’s failure to deliver equality for women results from fundamental biases of design

Democracy’s failure to deliver equality for women results from fundamental biases of design

If women are to be politically equal, the entire institutional structure and culture requires root and branch reform, writes Joni Lovenduski. She explains why democracy has failed to deliver equality for women.

Most democratic governments claim to support equality for women, but none have so far achieved it. Even after decades of struggle and despite significant progress, at the beginning of […]

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    Book Review: Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century

Book Review: Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century

In Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century, Photis Lysandrou offers a critical analysis of the global commodity system and its various developmental tendencies. This is an excellent book, writes Scott Lavery, which deftly charts how financialised capitalism rose to ascendance and its impact on the world economy in the twenty-first century, while also pointing to fruitful areas of […]

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    Spoofing, truthing, and social proofing: digital influencing after terrorist attacks

Spoofing, truthing, and social proofing: digital influencing after terrorist attacks

Martin Innes, Helen Innes, and Diyana Dobreva explain how digital communications platforms are used in the aftermath of terrorist attacks to amplify or constrain their wider social impacts and consequences.

Terrorist attacks are fundamentally designed to ‘terrorise, polarise and mobilise’ different segments of the public. That this is so was tragically underscored by the recent events in New Zealand, where […]

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    To explain why socialism is still attractive, we must look at why liberalism is not

To explain why socialism is still attractive, we must look at why liberalism is not

Why are young people attracted to socialism? In its efforts to disperse power and fear, liberalism generates its own power structures and pathologies, writes Lea Ypi, and these are destructive in their own right.

Google “millennial socialism” and you will find hundreds of articles, ranging from the perplexed to the alarmed, trying to make sense of why, as the most […]

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    What explains the rising levels of lethal violence in England and Wales?

What explains the rising levels of lethal violence in England and Wales?

Is there a causal association between rising lethal violence and the policy context of austerity, as has recently been suggested? Anthony Ellis explains in what sense austerity may be an important piece of the puzzle of rising violence, alongside the effects of inequality, competitive individualism, and insecurity.

In the wake of the fatal stabbings of Jodie Chesney and Yousef Makki […]

The marginal effects of campaigning in marginal seats

A substantial body of research shows that British political parties benefit electorally from their constituency campaigns, especially where they are the local challenger in a seat. But,  Ron Johnston, Charles Pattie and Todd Hartman explain, the marginal returns parties get on their local campaigns are not the same everywhere. Parties get more electoral bang for their campaign buck in the […]

Why the ‘Life in the UK’ test alienates new citizens

The UK’s citizenship process subjects immigrants to requirements intended to enhance their identification with ‘British values’. Does the current process do that, or does it exacerbate immigrants’ marginalisation? David Bartram finds evidence in support of the latter: citizenship policy does more to alienate new citizens than it does to facilitate their political integration.

Have you taken the ‘Life in the […]