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    Johnson’s defence of war metaphors and blame of all sides turns MPs into enemy targets

Johnson’s defence of war metaphors and blame of all sides turns MPs into enemy targets

When the Prime Minister endorses the violence of war to refer to parliamentary politics, he aligns himself with a tradition of thinking for which those with whom we disagree are not just adversaries to engage with, but enemy targets to be destroyed, writes Lea Ypi.

‘Tempers on both sides have become inflamed’, Boris Johnson declared recently while refusing to apologise […]

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    Tackling smoking: never mind health, we need to talk about price

Tackling smoking: never mind health, we need to talk about price

Frances Thirlway explains why smokers’ concerns about addiction provide an unlikely but compelling rationale for making a minimum price strategy a central part of tobacco control.

People stop smoking for health reasons, right? We all know the link between smoking and cancer, not to mention heart disease, stroke and many other conditions. But that doesn’t necessarily mean we stop smoking or […]

How can we restore trust and integrity into public life?

With citizen distrust of politics steadily rising, bringing ethical concerns into mainstream public life is the most urgent political project, argues Bob Hudson. He writes that a mix of best practice, regulation, and legislation would help institutionalise the principles that ought to be guiding decision-making.

There has probably never been so much talk of mistrust and betrayal in British public […]

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    Flawed data? Why NHS spending on the independent sector may actually be much more than 7%

Flawed data? Why NHS spending on the independent sector may actually be much more than 7%

The presentation of data on NHS expenditure is flawed, writes David Rowland, which prevents policymakers from having a clear understanding of where money within the system is going. He estimates that in 2018/19, the amount spent by NHS England on the independent sector was around 26% of total expenditure, not 7% as widely reported. 

Claims regarding the extent of NHS […]

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    Parents, poverty and the state: reducing pressures on parents and increasing their capabilities

Parents, poverty and the state: reducing pressures on parents and increasing their capabilities

Naomi Eisenstadt and Carey Oppenheim argue that a more joined-up approach is needed to improve outcomes for children: both reducing child poverty and improving parental capacity by providing better support systems.

In the last two decades, political parties have lost their earlier resistance to preaching about family life. For most of the twentieth century, fears of the nanny state and […]

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    Governing without ministers: Northern Ireland power-sharing should be a priority for the UK government

Governing without ministers: Northern Ireland power-sharing should be a priority for the UK government

Northern Ireland has been without a functioning Executive or Assembly since January 2017. Jill Rutter and Jess Sargeant detail the consequences, which would be particularly severe in the case of a no deal Brexit, and set out proposals for reform.

When a local council collapses, the government sends in commissioners to sort it out. But the government has allowed Northern Ireland to near 1000 […]

Renewing and rethinking bilateralism after Brexit

Andrew Glencross examines some of the key policy challenges that arise from the UK’s need to renew and rethink bilateral relations with a number of European countries after Brexit.

The 2016 referendum fundamentally unsettled the UK’s diplomatic moorings. Up to this point, the UK had treated EU relations as a subset of its broader multilateral strategy for promoting its interests. […]

September 26th, 2019|Brexit, Featured|1 Comment|
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    The current constitutional crisis is neither uniquely British nor uniquely about where sovereignty lies

The current constitutional crisis is neither uniquely British nor uniquely about where sovereignty lies

While the Supreme Court has signalled its determination to defend established constitutional principles in the prorogation case, a problem underlying recent crises is the idea of national sovereignty, argues Marinos Diamantides. This idea is at odds with the reality of governing nation-states.

Secular liberal constitutionalism rests on postulates replete with inevitable contradictions and paradoxes. Thus, in the UK the rule […]