House of Lords Reform

House of Lords Reform

In May 2011 Nick Clegg – as part of the newly elected coalition government – outlined plans for a smaller, mostly elected House of Lords. In the following months we debated the role of the Lords in a modern democracy, the politics of peerage and the necessity of elections.

Nick Clegg’s proposals for reform of the House of Lords just don’t work

As part of our ongoing series on reform of the House of Lords, Lord Lipsey examines Nick Clegg’s recent proposals to reform the second chamber. He finds that the proposals will cost over £400million, lead to competition between the chambers, and are not even truly democratic. Reform is needed – but not these reforms. There are some compelling reasons why […]

House of Lords reform, a new theme for British Politics and Policy at LSE

Beginning with Tim Bale’s article today, British Politics and Policy at LSE is launching a new theme – House of Lords reform.

Nick Clegg’s proposed reforms to the House of Lords is a solution seeking a problem

Last month, Nick Clegg and the government launched a draft bill outlining plans for a smaller, mostly elected House of Lords. While advocates say that it will make the Lords more accountable and representative, the plan’s detractors are concerned that it will remove the experience and expertise currently present in the current House of Lords. Looking at a recent survey […]