Housing

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    Banking cultures, land valuation, and ‘doom loops’ (or, why you can’t afford a house in the UK)

Banking cultures, land valuation, and ‘doom loops’ (or, why you can’t afford a house in the UK)

UK house prices are now nine times the average income. Why is the cost of a new home moving so far beyond the reach of most people? Josh Ryan-Collins explains how banks are the missing piece in the puzzle, and outlines the problematic relationship between banks, land prices and home ownership in the UK. When compared to other countries it is clear: it […]

Eco-homes offer one solution to building on flood plains

Despite the recent extensive flooding and acknowledgment of the increasing consequences of climate change at the Paris talks last month, there is little public discussion about building eco-homes. Here, Jenny Pickerill outlines the argument for getting these builds onto the agenda; these would be homes which would not just be cheaper to live in but built to withstand flooding and […]

How to increase housing supply in England: a ten-point plan

Drawing on past research, Glen Bramley outlines ten ideas that could help increase housebuilding in England. His plan covers various points of the process, from how the planning system works to the need for a revised Green Belt policy as well as the benefits of enhancing the role of local authorities.

In November last year, I was invited to meet […]

January 25th, 2016|Featured, Housing|3 Comments|
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    Solving the housing crisis: the economics of Ronald Coase might have some answers

Solving the housing crisis: the economics of Ronald Coase might have some answers

Low house-building levels and the unaffordability of existing homes are problems that have been plaguing Britain for decades. Yet contrary to popular belief, academic economists might have some practical answers to offer, argues Steve Davies, and illustrates his case using the “forever contemporary” thinking of Nobel-prize winner Ronald Coase.

Many think that the work of academic economists has little or […]

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    The Housing and Planning Bill will determine how devolution is debated in the future

The Housing and Planning Bill will determine how devolution is debated in the future

With Parliament having voted in favour of adopting English Votes for English Laws on 22 October, the Housing and Planning Bill became the first piece of legislation to be considered under the new process. Steffan Evans writes that the Speaker’s interpretation of the new Standing Orders during the Bill’s second reading will have a significant impact on how devolution […]

Growing up in regenerating neighbourhoods

In this article, Joanne Neary examines young people’s experiences of living in neighbourhoods undergoing large scale urban regeneration. She finds, among other things, that some of the young people discussed are feeling frustrated at not being involved in the planning process.
Walking around a neighbourhood in the North of Glasgow with a group of teenagers on a windy day, I am […]

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    The super-rich in London: they live amongst us, but you won’t run into them (if they can help it)

The super-rich in London: they live amongst us, but you won’t run into them (if they can help it)

One way of thinking about the wealthy and inequality in our cities is to consider how they circulate and engage with public spaces, to what extent are the super-rich really engaged with the city and why does this matter? Themes of privacy, security, status and London’s relative safety emerge as key to these flows, writes Rowland Atkinson.

The Daily Telegraph recently […]

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    How extending the right to buy in England could change the relationship between the government and housing associations

How extending the right to buy in England could change the relationship between the government and housing associations

In this article, Steffan Evans looks at how the extension of Right to Buy in England could alter the relationship between the government, the regulator and Housing Associations in England, and compares the situation in England with the situation in Wales.

Ever since the formation of the Tenants Service Authority and the Homes and Communities Agency in 2008 there has been […]