James Strong

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    Without an agreement between the party leaders there is nothing further that Britain can do for Syria

Without an agreement between the party leaders there is nothing further that Britain can do for Syria

The recent attacks on Beruit, Paris and a Russian airliner flying over the Sinai desert indicate ISIS is growing bolder and the question of Britain’s response has naturally returned to the fore. But James Strong argues that the latest international attack will change nothing about the politics of British policy in Syria due to the impasse created by Cameron […]

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    Jeremy Corbyn’s views on British defence policy lie far outside the mainstream

Jeremy Corbyn’s views on British defence policy lie far outside the mainstream

In this article, James Strong examines Jeremy Corbyn’s track record on foreign policy and defence issues. His views, particularly regarding Russia and action against ISIS, clearly place him at odds with the electorate.

The first important point to make when studying Jeremy Corbyn’s foreign and defence policy views is that no-one yet knows how far he will try to impose them on […]

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    U-turn if you want to: Why Cameron isn’t bound to pre-election promises on defence

U-turn if you want to: Why Cameron isn’t bound to pre-election promises on defence

David Cameron could yet use the next SDSR to roll back his pre-election commitments regarding defence spending, argues James Strong. While flip-flopping can cause political embarassment, some promises are more easily broken than others, specifically when the public may not particularly care about individual commitments.

One of the problems facing the upcoming Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) is how much of it has been decided in […]

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    Foreign policy fault lines: defence spending, Trident and the EU

Foreign policy fault lines: defence spending, Trident and the EU

Foreign policy has not featured heavily in the political debates so far, but it does represent a key area of fault lines among the parties contesting the 2015 general election, says James Strong. With a high probability of a hung parliament, we can expect three issues to have a significant impact on coalition negotiations: overall defence spending, the Trident nuclear deterrent and […]

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    The significance of parliament’s vote to intervene militarily in Iraq

The significance of parliament’s vote to intervene militarily in Iraq

The UK parliament has authorised military action against ISIL militants in Iraq (but not Syria) in a vote that cut across party lines. James Strong examines the significance of the vote, writing that in military terms, the vote was mostly insignificant as Britain will contribute just six Tornado jets to fighting in Iraq. It was far more significant from a […]

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    Five questions that need to be answered before the UK intervenes in Iraq

Five questions that need to be answered before the UK intervenes in Iraq

Before supporting strikes against the Islamic State, David Cameron needs to answer some important questions, writes James Strong. He argues that Islamic State is indisputable our enemy and that if we can identify our friends, build a political settlement worth supporting and identify the limits of what we are willing to do, we should be prepared once again to send our troops abroad.

Britain […]

Britain should prepare for military action in Iraq

More than a decade after the invasion of Iraq, and as Sunni jihadists wreak death and destruction in much of the country, there is once more a debate in the UK regarding whether to intervene militarily. James Strong argues that there is a strong case for intervention and that Britain should start planning for military action. However, unless there is a viable political settlement in […]

Prominent coverage given to repatriations does not seem to undermine the public’s willingness to stay the course in military campaigns

James Strong investigates whether the greater prominence given to individual military casualties in recent years made the British public more sceptical about military action in general. He finds that prominent coverage of military casualties causes the public to pay greater attention to military campaigns, but does not necessarily shape public attitudes towards those campaigns. An MoD study from 2012, obtained by The […]