Party politics and elections

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    Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Artemis Photiadou and Alice Park draw on various strands of research to argue that unless a Conservative manifesto is more radical and relevant than this Queen’s Speech, then a future Johnson government will fail to address fundamental issues, many of which have been caused by other Conservative policies.

Though the likelihood remains the Queen’s Speech will be voted down in […]

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    The European Union is not a state: why the debate about the EU and democracy is misconceived

The European Union is not a state: why the debate about the EU and democracy is misconceived

The more the EU seems to resemble a state rather than an international organisation, writes Pippa Catterall, the more it becomes judged by the normative expectations of how democratic states are. But it is as an international organisation that it should be judged.

No international organisation is ‘democratic’. Indeed, there is only one international organisation which even tries to be […]

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    Austerity and the gender-age gap in the 2015 and 2017 general elections

Austerity and the gender-age gap in the 2015 and 2017 general elections

Anna Sanders and Rosalind Shorrocks examine the impact of austerity on vote choice in the last two general elections. They find that younger women were particularly anti-austerity and thus less supportive of the Conservative Party. However, the same was not true for older women, who were protected by the Coalition’s policies on pensions and were more similar to men […]

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    Labour and Brexit: Corbyn’s ‘neutrality’ on a second referendum is not neutral

Labour and Brexit: Corbyn’s ‘neutrality’ on a second referendum is not neutral

Jeremy Corbyn’s stance on Brexit in the run up to the 2019 party conference is far from neutral and endangers his entire project to transform British politics, explains Eunice Goes.

This year’s annual conference was supposed to be a launchpad from where Labour would show voters that the party is ready to govern the country. Jeremy Corbyn even announced his […]

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    A nation of Brendas? What the public really thinks of a general election – and why Westminster gets it wrong

A nation of Brendas? What the public really thinks of a general election – and why Westminster gets it wrong

It is generally believed that voters are experiencing election fatigue, wanting politicians to sort things out rather than having to go to the polls again. However, data suggests the public actually support an early election. Lawrence McKay argues that this error is driven by lingering pre-Brexit concerns over public ‘apathy’ and by journalists’ anxieties about living in the Westminster […]

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    Calling it quits: why some parties’ MPs leave office earlier than others

Calling it quits: why some parties’ MPs leave office earlier than others

While several studies have examined retirements from the US Congress, fewer studies have examined retirement patterns in other legislatures. Christopher D. Raymond and Marvin Overby examine partisan differences in retirement rates in Britain and Canada.

One interesting finding to emerge from the literature on the US Congress is that Republican legislators retire from office earlier in their careers than their […]

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    (Not) Coming to terms with EC membership: Labour and the common agricultural policy in the 1970s

(Not) Coming to terms with EC membership: Labour and the common agricultural policy in the 1970s

The common agricultural policy can serve as a lens to shed light on the wider question of how UK governments adapted to European Community membership, writes Katja Seidel.

The Conservative Party has fallen apart over Europe. After expelling its centrist and pro-European MPs, Boris Johnson is set on turning the Tories into a hard-line Brexit party. Labour has thus far […]

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    How many new peers would it take to turn the Lords in favour of no-deal Brexit?

How many new peers would it take to turn the Lords in favour of no-deal Brexit?

While there are procedural reasons that render the appointment of a large number of peers at once unlikely, Mike Kellermann writes that the move would also not make a difference if the aim was to block legislation prohibiting a no-deal Brexit. He explains why hundreds of new peers would be required to ensure such a working majority in the […]