Peter Sloman

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    Would Justin Trudeau’s ‘sunny ways’ work in the UK? Lessons we can (and can’t) draw from Canada

Would Justin Trudeau’s ‘sunny ways’ work in the UK? Lessons we can (and can’t) draw from Canada

British politicians have a long history of looking across the Atlantic for policy and campaign ideas. Since Justin Trudeau’s landslide election victory in October 2015, however, Canada has begun to displace the US as the focus of progressive admiration. Yet direct comparisons may not be very insightful, explains Peter Sloman.

Labour politicians wonder how the 43-year-old Trudeau managed to deflect […]

Activation or redistribution? The mystery of tax credits

The latest row over welfare cuts has focussed attention on the merits and limitations of the tax credits system which Gordon Brown put in place almost twenty years ago. Peter Sloman examines why tax credits are so controversial and how the debate has been obscured for so long.

George Osborne’s proposal to cut £4 billion from tax credits has provoked […]

The Farron era begins. Can the Liberal Democrats recover?

After a bruising election result which wiped out forty years of incremental progress for the Liberal Democrats, the party’s newly elected leader, Tim Farron, is under no illusions about the scale of the task facing the party. In this article, Peter Sloman looks at whether the party can recover from the setbacks of coalition government.

As parliament breaks up for its summer […]

Where next for the Liberal Democrats?

Labour’s predicament is difficult, but it is the Liberal Democrats who face an existential crisis. What then should the Lib Dems do next? The overriding priority must be to restore trust in the party, writes Peter Sloman.
The general election results marked a damaging setback for Labour and a brutal defeat for the Liberal Democrats. In 2010, patterns of tactical voting which had built up over twenty […]

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    Nick Clegg and British liberalism: revival, betrayal, or repositioning?

Nick Clegg and British liberalism: revival, betrayal, or repositioning?

The Liberal Democrats’ rightward shift in the decade since The Orange Book has helped make the Cameron-Clegg coalition possible. Peter Sloman asks whether we should see it as a revival of classical liberalism, a reflection of neoliberal influences, or simply a recalibration of the party’s existing thought.

One of the most fruitful debates in British political studies over the past […]