Stephen Machin

Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?

Recessions typically raise youth unemployment and leave long­term labour market ‘scars’ on the young people concerned. Research by Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin finds that they also have a disturbing and substantial impact in launching criminal careers.

Recessions typically lead to an increase in youth unemployment rates, leaving young people to face more difficulties in finding jobs. Concerns […]

Real wages and living standards: the latest UK evidence

Since the global financial crisis, workers’ real wages and family living standards in the UK have suffered to an extent unprecedented in modern history. Real wages of the typical (median) worker have fallen by almost 10 per cent since 2008; and real family incomes for families of working age by almost the same. In this article, part of CEP’s Election Analysis, […]

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    Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers in the UK has been positive

Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers in the UK has been positive

Has the rapid influx of international students into UK universities over the past two decades reduced or expanded the number of places available for domestic UK students? Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy find that domestic undergraduate numbers have been unaffected while domestic postgraduate numbers are up.

Over the past 20 years, the total number of overseas students in UK universities has quadrupled. There are now 266,000 full-time international students in the UK […]

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    Does tougher sentencing deter crime? Evidence from the London 2011 riots suggests it does

Does tougher sentencing deter crime? Evidence from the London 2011 riots suggests it does

After the 2011 London riots, large numbers of rioters were convicted and given much harsher sentences than for people convicted of the same kinds of crimes before the riots occurred. Did the tougher sentencing have a deterrent effect on crime? Laura Jaitman and Stephen Machin analyse the potential effect on crime of the severe sanctions that were enacted. Their results […]

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    Unless economic growth is more fairly distributed and productivity boosted, the typical UK worker can expect meagre real wage growth

Unless economic growth is more fairly distributed and productivity boosted, the typical UK worker can expect meagre real wage growth

The pain of the UK’s Great Recession has been spread more evenly than previous downturns, with falling real wages across the distribution. David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin ask why this happened, how it compares with the US experience and what the prospects are for recovering lost wage gains.

There have been unprecedented falls in real wages in the UK since the start of the recession triggered by the financial […]

Education in Scotland: Performance in a devolved policy area

As the people of Scotland consider their vote in next year’s referendum, what evidence is there that the nation can succeed ‘on its own’? Gill Wyness, Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally explore how Scotland compares with the rest of the UK in education, an area of public policy that is already highly devolved.  When considering whether or not Scotland should […]

Technological changes in the workplace have seen a rise in the demand for, and the wages of, postgraduates. But this has led to widening wage inequalities between postgraduates and undergraduate-only workers.

Growing numbers of university students in Britain and the United States are staying on after their first degrees to invest in a postgraduate qualification. Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin find that workplace technological changes, such as increasing computer use, has driven rises in the demand for workers with postgraduate qualifications, leading to widening wage inequalities among graduates and across the […]

Academy schools under Labour combated disadvantage and increased pupil achievement: the coalition’s new policy may exacerbate existing inequalities

With the recent accusation that Michael Gove has been sending ‘mixed messages’ over academy schools, it is clear that the policy is still  very controversial. Stephen Machin and James Vernoit take a step back and compare the academy schools created by Labour with the new ‘coalition academies’  that have either opened this autumn or applied for academy status since […]