Steve Coulter

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    Poking the beehive: at the cost of upsetting industrial relations, the Trade Union Bill will provoke further political strife within Labour

Poking the beehive: at the cost of upsetting industrial relations, the Trade Union Bill will provoke further political strife within Labour

Sajid Javid, the government’s new Business Secretary, has just announced proposals aimed at curbing the power of trade unions and weakening their ability to fund the Labour party. Steve Coulter argues that, in an environment of benign industrial relations, the motive for the Bill can be seen as largely political; the move will aggravate the fault-line in Labour between its Blairite and […]

Labour and the unions: the awkward couple

Labour is in a difficult situation as it looks to elect a new leader. It desperately needs the big, militant unions to back off and not taint their next leader by treating him or her as their puppet. To the unions, on the other hand, it’s vital that they not allow the next Labour leader to ignore their concerns, writes […]

Deficit reduction is important, but it’s not the end of the story. If we are to achieve real long term growth, government must come up with creative solutions to overcome the institutional and productive constraints on the economy.

An obsession with deficit reduction has diverted attention away from the need to revamp the UK’s industrial base. Steve Coulter argues that the coalition government has belatedly turned its attention towards industrial policy with its ‘growth review’; but there is little sign so far of effective and novel policies. Tomorrow’s Autumn Statement will flag up lower growth and higher borrowing […]

Book Review: The Strange Non-Death of Neoliberalism

Colin Crouch presents readers with a well-reasoned analysis of the financial crisis and economic developments in the West since the end of the ‘golden age’ thirty years ago, finds Steve Coulter.   The Strange Non-Death of Neoliberalism. Colin Crouch. Polity. June 2011. Find this book:   How did neoliberal economic policies come to supplant the Keynesian welfare state in the 1990s? […]

Book Review: Everyday Life in British Government

Steve Coulter reviews R.A.W. Rhodes’ fascinating and insightful work on the inner workings of the Whitehall machine, which lends truth to many of the rumours about the chaotic nature of New Labour.   Everyday Life in British Government. R.A.W. Rhodes. Oxford University Press. April 2011. Find this book at:   How does the British political elite think and act? And how can […]

Book Review: The Cameron Clegg Government: Coalition Politics in an Age of Austerity

Steve Coulter delves into the latest title on the coalition’s ramshackle marriage of convenience, finding a useful book for students and general readers.   The Cameron Clegg Government: Coalition Politics in an Age of Austerity. By Simon Lee and Matt Beech. Palgrave Macmillan. April 2011. Find this book at:  The Con-Dem coalition – Britain’s first in peacetime in 100 years […]

Book Review: Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class

Steve Coulter comes across painstakingly argued theories but is not convinced by Hacker and Pierson‘s account of America’s wealth distribution.   Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer And Turned Its Back on the Middle Class. Paul Pierson and Jacob S. Hacker. Simon & Schuster. September 2010. Find this book at:    The US is the world’s richest country, and […]

Book Review: The Conservative Party from Thatcher to Cameron

Steve Coulter finds an excellent and readable account of how the Conservatives have turned themselves around, in Tim Bale’s new book, The Conservative Party from Thatcher to Cameron.

 

The Conservative Party from Thatcher to Cameron. Tim Bale. Polity Press. February 2011.

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The Conservatives are allegedly the Western world’s oldest and most successful political party, dominating British politics in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries thanks […]