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    The funding of politics in Great Britain – an issue transformed

The funding of politics in Great Britain – an issue transformed

Political party financing may not regularly hit the headlines in the UK, especially in the wake of Brexit and the more pressing concerns politicians appear to face, but, Sam Power argues here, it is an issue that will not go away any time soon. Drawing on recent research, he explores recent changes in how party financing has evolved.

The recent […]

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    ‘Socially useful’ finance and the regulation of peer-to-peer lending in the United Kingdom

‘Socially useful’ finance and the regulation of peer-to-peer lending in the United Kingdom

Economic policy has been a central debate in British politics since the economic crash. Here, Chris Rogers and Chris Clarke assess how peer to peer lending has changed this landscape. 

The crisis of 2008 and its aftermath ignited a debate about the role of finance in society.  Critics suggested that financial services had become too dominant in large economies, that […]

Industrial strategy: some lessons from the past

Industrial strategy is back on the government’s agenda, with a promise to produce a ‘match fit’ economy that ‘works for everyone’ and is able to thrive after Brexit. As yet, however, there is little sign of the promised broadly-based and coherent industrial strategy emerging. In crafting it, explains Hugh Pemberton, its architects may profitably look back to the 1960s […]

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    Gamers or victims: how can you ‘play the game’ on benefits if you don’t know the rules?

Gamers or victims: how can you ‘play the game’ on benefits if you don’t know the rules?

Portrayals of welfare users being lazy and work-shy, manipulating the system to receive support, are common. Drawing on research, Jenny McNeill explains the extent to which cynical manipulation is present in the conduct of welfare support recipients.

Media and government are fixated on the pervasiveness of so-called ‘scroungers’: people cheating the benefits system for welfare they are not entitled to, […]

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    Book Review: Electronic Dreams. How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer by Tom Lean

Book Review: Electronic Dreams. How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer by Tom Lean

In Electronic Dreams: How 1980s Britain Learned to Love the Computer, Tom Lean offers a new study of the history of personal computing by deftly tracing links between users, emerging technologies, makers and the wider context of government thinking and media in eighties Britain. With the book largely avoiding nostalgia, Peter Webster recommends this as essential reading for all those interested […]

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    Increasing the number of faith schools could also increase social segregation and lower social mobility

Increasing the number of faith schools could also increase social segregation and lower social mobility

Faith schools generally achieve better exam results than their counterparts. But how much of this success is down to their intake? Rebecca Johnes and Jon Andrews find that much of the difference can be attributed to social selection: faith schools on average admit fewer pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds than non-faith schools. Increasing the number of faith schools could therefore increase social […]

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    The Prevent duty: Difficult decisions for teachers in identifying radicalisation and extremism

The Prevent duty: Difficult decisions for teachers in identifying radicalisation and extremism

The ‘Prevent’ strategy is now an important part of UK governement counter-terrorism strategy. But, asks Robert Hindle, does this place undue pressure on teachers in our schools, and encourage bias and prejudice against minority communities?

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch pronounces that ‘a jury is only as sound as the men that make it up’.  Despite evidence to […]

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    The House of Lords’ powers on statutory instruments survive

The House of Lords’ powers on statutory instruments survive

In the long age of abortive Lords reforms, Theresa May has installed a new chapter by backing off from her predecessor’s plans to strip the upper House of its power to vote down statutory instruments – the main form of delegated legislation vital to the UK government’s extensive executive powers. Richard Reid argues that the decision reflects upcoming Brexit […]