Weekly Political Blog Round Up

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    The economics of redistribution, Clegg v Farage and education reforms: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

The economics of redistribution, Clegg v Farage and education reforms: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On Politics @ Surrey, Simon Usherwood looks forward to the Clegg versus Farage debate on Europe, outlining what this might do for the respective parties as they gear up for the European Parliament elections.

On VoxEU, the authors of a recent IMF research paper into the effects of redistribution on economic growth present their findings. “To put it simply, we […]

Power addictions, happiness inequality and contingency plans: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On Politics in Spires, Nayef Al-Rodhan explores the neurochemistry of power. “When withheld, power – like any highly addictive agent – produces cravings at the cellular level that generate strong behavioural opposition to giving it up.”

The reduction in happiness inequality that economic growth brings poses a challenge for the left, writes Chris Dillow on Stumbling and Mumbling. “If we believe that what matters most is people’s well-being, […]

Measuring progress, how and why the coalition might end prematurely, and the ‘naughty child’ of Europe: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On VoxEU, Diane Coyle examines the debate in how we measure progress. Criticisms of GDP have grown recently and many argue that subjective wellbeing (or happiness as it is sometimes known) should take its place. She argues that “There are good arguments for paying less attention to GDP and more to indicators of welfare and sustainability, but it would be a […]

The floods spat, an independent Scotland without the pound, and what government economists can do: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On SPERI Comment, Stephanie Mudge argues that it’s time emphasise the ‘political’ in political economy and “to treat the way we organise democratic representation as just as important as how we write economic policy”.

On the Devolution Matters blog, Alan Trench explores the implications of George Osborne’s recent pronouncement on a potential currency union with an independent Scotland. “The challenge that now faces the […]

Citizenship-stripping, drivers of inequality and the apolitical Olympic Games: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On openDemocracy’s openSecurity blog, Alice Ross and Patrick Galey write about the last-minute amendment to the government’s immigration bill last week that enables Theresa May to strip individuals of their UK citizenship if she deems their presence “not conducive to the public good”. Moreover, this can be done without recourse to a court.

On the SPERI Comment blog, Scott Lavery writes about the […]

The lobbying bill smoke-screen and tax-rises for top income earners: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On openDemocracy’s OurKingdom blog, Jonathan Gray writes about the lobbying bill, which is now set to become law after three amendments by the House of Lords were defeated this week. “Far from shining a light on the activities of the influence industry, the proposed registry would exclude the vast majority of commercial lobbyists, covering as little as 5 per […]

Going easy on Lord Rennard, and a bad week for aspiring women leaders: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On openDemocracy’s OurKingdom blog, Rupert Read asks why so many LibDems are going easy on Lord Rennard, who has been accused by multiple women of inappropriate sexual conduct and abuse of power. “They appear to be spending much more energy on Rennard (in some cases: on defending Rennard) than they ever did on the NHS” because he’s seen as […]

History wars, minimum generosity and looking past the headlines on immigration: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

Writing for the Royal United Services Institute, Gary Sheffield, Professor of War Studies at the University of Wolverhampton, comments on Michael Gove’s politicisation of the WW1. He writes that “it is not too late to disentangle the Centenary of the First World War from crude partisan politics”.

George Osborne announced this week that he’d like to see a ‘real terms rise’ […]