Weekly Political Blog Round Up

Rebalancing, the ‘British’ question, and the right to secede: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On the SPERI Comment blog, Craig Berry examines the data and finds that there has been little rebalancing towards manufacturing in the UK economy.

With a new European Commission being appointed later this year, Tim Oliver discusses the headaches the ‘British question’ is likely to give them on the E!Sharp blog.

OpenDemocracy, Dimitar Bechev writes that the panic in Britain over prospective […]

Longer bread lines, the trade-off between human rights and national security, and expanding Heathrow: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On the SPERI Comment blog, Sébastien Rioux writes about the rising use of food banks in the UK and other advanced capitalist countries. “The growth of food banks and other forms of hunger-relief charities is a strong reminder of the ‘pseudo-recovery’ we are in and that the financial crisis hasn’t gone away.”

On the PSA’s Political Insight blog, Ipek Demirsu […]

Outsourcing public services and cutting the size of the state: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On his Mainly Macro blog, Simon Wren-Lewis discusses the undeliverable and unrealistically massive cut to the size of the state that George Osborne presented at last week’s Autumn statement. “It is, as ever with this Chancellor, all about the politics.”

Writing on the University of Manchester’s Whitehall Watch blog, Stephen Wilks comments on the NAO’s memorandum on public service delivery which shows […]

The Autumn statement and economic inequality: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

Reacting to the Autumn statement, Duncan Weldon points out that we are back in the pre-crisis growth model on the ToUChstone blog. On the Whitehall Watch blog, Colin Talbot argues that the Chancellor’s speech shows his real intentions: to permanently roll back state spending.

Earlier this week, in a speech in honour of Margaret Thatcher, Boris Johnson justified economic inequality and claimed […]

‘Benefit tourism’ and keeping up with the Joneses: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

This week, Boris Johnson caused a stir when he said in a speech that “[s]ome measure of inequality is essential for the spirit of envy and keeping up with the Joneses that is, like greed, a valuable spur to economic activity.” Chris Dillow of the Stumbling and Mumbling blog examines what mechanisms might cause inequality to depress growth, writing that Boris “was […]

Accepting austerity and economic fallacies: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

On his Mainly Macro blog, and in response to an article applauding the British for their dutiful acceptance of austerity, Simon Wren-Lewis writes that “the fact that [austerity] has been accepted with little protest is not something to be commended (unless you are in the business of manipulating opinion), but a major problem. It is a huge failure for good government, […]

Machiavellian chutzpah, eternal austerity and ‘green taxes’: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

“In an act of brazen Machiavellian chutzpah mixed with untold naivety”, writes Thom Brooks on The Conversation, “the [Conservative] party has tried to erase records of speeches and press releases published between 2000 and its coming to power in [2010].” They didn’t realise that to delete content permanently from the internet would be near impossible.

Commenting on David Cameron’s call for permanent […]

‘The taxpayer’, being young in Briton and ‘Civic Capitalism’: Top 5 blogs you might have missed this week

Writing for the New Statesman, Danny Dorling argues that the young in Briton are being taken for a ride. “The young are discriminated against in ways in which it would be illegal to differentiate between men and women, or between more and less disabled people, or on the basis of race or religion.”

On SPERI Comment, Colin Hay and Tony […]