human rights

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    Religious diversity in the workplace: the case for alternative dispute resolution

Religious diversity in the workplace: the case for alternative dispute resolution

Élise Rouméas uses a recent court case involving an NHS nurse being dismissed for proselytising religious views to explain why the matter could have been handled differently. Specifically, she argues that cases such as this illustrate how alternative dispute resolution ought to be seen as a desirable complement to the rule of law rather than a cheaper alternative.

In 2016, […]

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    Abortion law reform in Northern Ireland: celebrations and cautions

Abortion law reform in Northern Ireland: celebrations and cautions

Fran Amery offers an overview of the recent amendment to liberalise abortion law in Northern Ireland and explains why, despite there still being ways that change could be blocked, the development shows the strength of feeling about this issue in Parliament.

On 9 July, an amendment was successfully attached to the government’s Northern Ireland (Executive Formation) Bill requiring the government […]

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    Prisoner voting rights: the conflict between the government and the courts was really about executive power

Prisoner voting rights: the conflict between the government and the courts was really about executive power

In UK political disputes over European Court of Human Rights judgments, such as the high-profile objections to rulings on prisoner voting, much political capital is made out of the claim that the European Court is impinging on parliamentary sovereignty. However, Helen Hardman argues that the objections have instead been based on concern that court rulings would limit the decision-making […]

June 20th, 2019|Featured|1 Comment|
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    Islamic divorce in the English courts: human rights and sharia law

Islamic divorce in the English courts: human rights and sharia law

As the majority of Muslim marriages in England are not legally recognised, women are in a particularly vulnerable position should those marriages break down. However, in one recent case a novel judgment has opened the door for the wife to seek some financial recourse. Alistair Jones perceives this to be a significant development, yet he also stresses that legal solutions have […]

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    Four policy proposals to improve disabled people’s employment and pay

Four policy proposals to improve disabled people’s employment and pay

To make employment inclusive for people living with disability or health conditions, there is an urgent need to rethink both how we campaign for change as well as what policy changes we are pushing for. Based on her work with the LSE, Liz Sayce discusses four key proposals that would make the workplace accessible, fair, and inclusive.

In the endeavours of […]

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    Complicity in the death penalty: just how out of step are Javid’s actions with British policy?

Complicity in the death penalty: just how out of step are Javid’s actions with British policy?

The Home Secretary recently agreed to assist the US in the prosecution of two formerly British men without seeking assurances that they would not face the death penalty. Bharat Malkani writes that, while this particular case was out of step with usual policy, there’s more to understanding British complicity in human rights abuses. 

On 23 July, it was revealed that the Home […]

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    Automation and the billionaires’ dystopia: how to defend economic democracy

Automation and the billionaires’ dystopia: how to defend economic democracy

The narrative that automation will lead to mass unemployment and thus people should settle for a basic income rather than good jobs needs to be challenged, writes Ewan McGaughey. He explains how the law can help secure fair wages and working conditions for everyone.

Technology today lets us create a paradise on Earth, where scarcity and poverty will be forgotten, but […]

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    Is the government changing its stance towards asylum seekers? Don’t hold your breath

Is the government changing its stance towards asylum seekers? Don’t hold your breath

Olivia Bridge discusses the latest changes in government policy on matters concerning asylum seekers. She argues that far from improving the currently insufficient and controversial system, the government appears to have no desire to step down from its hostile environment policy.

The UK is currently experiencing an unprecedented rise in support for asylum seekers: 47% Britons believe refugees ought to […]