Protest

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    Book Review: For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq by Ayça Çubukçu

Book Review: For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq by Ayça Çubukçu

In For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq, Ayça Çubukçu illustrates how different and sometimes colliding understandings of justice, human rights, legitimacy and international law co-existed in response to the Iraq occupation through the case of the World Tribunal on Iraq, which sought to document and provide grounds for adjudicating war crimes committed by the US, the UK and their allied […]

  • Permalink Protestors surround Hoa Hakananai’a at the British MuseumGallery

    “Please do not touch”: what the Hoa Hakananai’a controversy tells us about museums and why more sociologists should study them.

“Please do not touch”: what the Hoa Hakananai’a controversy tells us about museums and why more sociologists should study them.

MSc Sociology student Lucy Smith reflects on a visit to the British Museum and the implications of the protests over the display of Easter Island moai statue Hoa Hakananai’a.

In his 1992 paper ‘Where Are the Missing Masses? The Sociology of a Few Mundane Artifacts’, Bruno Latour observed how sociology suffers from a theoretical deficit. Scholars have, in his view, […]

The Revolution is being Televised, Blogged, Tweeted, You-Tubed and Stood Up

by Lisa McKenzie, LSE Fellow

 

A spectre is haunting London and that spectre is the rumble of grass roots civil disobedience, activism and – dare I say –  a people’s anarchism.

 

Karl Marx originally wrote the Communist Manifesto in 1848 as a pamphlet to be read and used by the masses in their class struggle. The Manifesto is a passionate and […]